Running a Survey vs. a Focus Group: What’s the Best Way to Collect Customer Reviews?

Pros and cons to consider before you begin your customer research

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Whether you run a brick and mortar business or create mobile apps, one of the most valuable tools at your disposal is customer feedback.

Why? Customer feedback helps you understand what you’re doing right, what you’re doing wrong, and gives you the information you need to make the right changes and improvements.

But there are different ways to collect customer feedback, including surveys and focus groups. Surveys and focus groups are both effective ways to solicit feedback from your customers—but each has its pros and cons. Here are a few ways to decide whether you should be running a focus group or a survey to listen to your customers.

What is a Focus Group?

A focus group is a form of qualitative research, which means it’s an exploratory rather than conclusive type of research–and they help you understand not only what your customers think, but also how and why they think that way.

Focus group definition: Focus groups are typically interactive group settings, held in a neutral place where your customers can feel comfortable telling you what they really think and are facilitated by a trained moderator. They’re a great way to hear firsthand feedback from your customers and they also have enough flexibility that you can make changes on the fly or deep dive into interesting things that come up over the course of the conversation.

What is a Survey?

Surveys tend to be classified as quantitative research and the results can be conclusive, unlike a focus group. They also let you ask questions and measure just about anything–and can be as short as a single question to as long as several hundred questions.

Answer formats can include multiple choice, rating scales and open-ended questions. In terms of both budget and timing, surveys offer a lot of flexibility as well. At the same time, surveys can be viewed as inflexible, because once you start running a survey, you shouldn’t make too many changes–because your questions need to be consistent in order to collect accurate data.

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Focus Groups vs. Surveys – Which to Use When?

Trying to decide whether you want to run a focus group or a survey? It helps to write down the questions you are trying to answer. Can they be answered through one-way questions or do they lend themselves to a conversation? Do you need directional information or statistical proof? Will you be comfortable making decisions from a handful of opinions, or do you need to get feedback from a larger sample size before moving forward?

(Psst. Use this sample size calculator – it’s an easy way to calculate your sample size.)

The Pros and Cons of Focus Groups and Surveys

Here’s a handy chart to help you decide whether you should be running a focus group or a survey to collect customer feedback.
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For both types of research, you’ll need to do similar preparation:

1. Set Goals.

Establish the main things you want to learn, and what decisions you hope to inform with your research. Solicit feedback from key internal stakeholders to make sure you get it right the first time

2. Recruit Participants.

Who do you want to participate? Equally important, who do you want to make sure to exclude? Think about their demographics (including but not limited to): age, gender, household income, profession, where they live. Do you have their contact information or do you need a company to put you in touch with your target audience? Do you want respondents or participants to be familiar with your product or product category? If you need help finding the right people to take your survey, SurveyMonkey Audience can get in touch with just about anybody, according to your specifications.

3. Develop a Discussion Guide (for focus groups).

The discussion guide is similar to a script for the moderator to use in the groups. What questions do you want the moderator to ask? What does s/he need to know about your project to answer participants’ questions?

4. Write good survey questions (for surveys).
5. Consider Participant Preparation.

Is there any activity or homework that participants need to do before the research begins?

6. Set Aside Budget for Compensation.

Weigh the pros and cons of incentivizing customer participation. How much, if anything, are you able to compensate participants for their time?

As a general rule of thumb, if you want to have a conversation with your customers that will help provide direction, pursue a focus group. If, however, you have well-defined questions and need to reach a large group or multiple groups of customers, a survey may better suit your needs. The combination of the two methodologies can also provide tremendous insight. Essentially, the focus group can provide the inspiration–and then the survey gives you validation!

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3 quick tips to improve survey response rates

Here are some ideas to ensure that respondents will answer your surveys.

1. Be quick

If your survey is short and sweet, there's a greater chance that more respondents will complete it.

2. Offer incentives

Little incentives like small discount or an entry into a drawing can help ensure respondents complete your survey.

3. Buy a targeted audience

With SurveyMonkey Audience, you can purchase access to an audience who meets specific demographic criteria for your survey. It's a great way to get targeted responses from a specific group.

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