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Polling

Los Angeles Times|SurveyMonkey Poll: Super Bowl LVI

Los Angeles Times|SurveyMonkey Poll: Super Bowl LVI

The Cincinnati Bengals are the fan-favorites nationally heading into the Super Bowl this weekend, even as most expect the Los Angeles Rams to prevail in their hometown, according to a new poll from the Los Angeles Times and SurveyMonkey.

Most (59%) want the Bengals to win the big game, versus 41% who are rooting for L.A. However, 56% expect the Rams to triumph, while 44% expect the Bengals to pull out a win

Californians, by wide margins, both want and expect the Rams to beat the Bengals

  • 73% of Californians want the Rams to win, vs. 27% who want the Bengals to win
    • Among those planning to watch, 74% want the Rams to win and 26% want the Bengals to win
  • 78% of Californians expect the Rams to win, vs. 22% who expect the Bengals to win 
    • Among those planning to watch, 80% expect the Rams to win and 20% expect the Bengals to win 

Even so, SoCal vs. NorCal rivalries dominate the story in California. 

  • 87% of Los Angeles Area residents want the Rams to win, while just 13% are cheering for the Bengals
  • The San Francisco Bay Area has a closer split between those cheering for the Rams (56%) and cheering for the Bengals (44%)

NFL does barely enough to support its players on issues of race and brain damage

For the past few seasons, issues related to race and social justice have swirled around the NFL and other professional sports leagues. In this new poll, a third of adults (34%) across the U.S. say the NFL hasn’t done enough to show respect for its Black players; 22% think the NFL has done “too much,” and 37% think the NFL has done “just enough” to show respect for its Black players.

  • Among NFL fans, 33% say the NFL hasn’t done enough, 44% say it has done “just enough” and 21% say it has done too much to support its Black players
  • 54% of Blacks say the NFL hasn’t done enough to support its Black players, while 33% say it has done “just enough” and 7% say it has done “too much”
  • 45% of Republicans think the NFL has done “too much” to support Black players, while 57% of Democrats say the NFL hasn’t done enough

The “Rooney Rule” garners significant support: a majority (63%) of adults in the U.S., and 71% of NFL fans support the requirement that teams interview minority candidates for coaching and high level jobs.

  • 80% of Blacks approve of the Rooney Rule, compared with 60% of whites, 67% of Hispanics, 70% of Asians, and 46% of adults of another race 
  • Big party gap here: Support among Republicans is just half as high as it is among Democrats (42% vs. 85%); it’s 67% among independents

A clear majority nationally (62%) say the NFL hasn’t done enough to respond to the risk of long-term brain damage among its athletes. Even among NFL fans, 59% say the league hasn’t done enough, 33% say it has done “just enough” and just 6% say it has done “too much” to respond to the risk of brain damage among athletes. 

  • Women are more likely than men to say the NFL hasn’t done enough (68% vs 55%) 
  • 73% of adults age 65+ say the NFL hasn’t done enough vs. 57% of those age 18-34 and 60% of those age 35-64 
  • 72% of Democrats say the NFL hasn’t done enough vs. 54% of Republicans and 61% of independents 

COVID’s effect on the Super Bowl

For most, the pandemic has no impact on their Super Bowl plans: 58% of adults have not changed their Super Bowl plans because of the pandemic. Just 9% say they will watch alone because of the pandemic; 32% plan to watch with fewer people than usual, and 40% plan to watch with family or friends this year.

  • Older adults are more cautious: 51% of those 65+ plan to watch at home vs.  25% of those 18-34 and 46% of those 35-64
  • 77% of Republicans say the pandemic has no impact on their plans vs. 43% of Democrats and 53% of independents 

Despite precautions, 66% of people say a Covid outbreak is likely to occur among the general public because of the Super Bowl.

Read more about our polling methodology here

Click through all the results in the interactive toplines below: