LeanIn.Org Launches #47PercentCounts on Latina Equal Pay Day to Highlight the Pay Gap Latinas Face

In partnership with adidas, Lyft, P&G, Reebok, SurveyMonkey, and UnidosUS, LeanIn.Org is highlighting the unfairness of this pay gap and the double discrimination that holds Latinas back.

Palo Alto, CA—November 1 is Latina Equal Pay Day, which marks how far Latinas had to work into 2018 to catch up with what white men earned in 2017 alone. On average, Latinas are paid 47 percent less than white men and 31 percent less than white women. Even when factors like education, experience, location, and occupation are taken into account, a pay gap remains. To raise awareness of the pay gap and its negative effect on Latinas and families, LeanIn.Org is launching #47PercentCounts, the final of three public awareness efforts this year rooted in the idea that equal pay matters.

New research conducted by LeanIn.Org and SurveyMonkey in partnership with UnidosUS shows that there is a striking lack of awareness around the pay gap Latinas face. Nearly one in three Americans is not aware of the pay gap between Latinas and white men, and more than four in ten Americans are not aware of the gap between Latinas and white women. When presented with information that Latinas on average are paid 47 percent less than white men, 72 percent of Americans think it’s not fair. In addition, 68 percent believe that bias against immigrants is a factor in the pay gap Latinas experience. Complete findings are listed in this release and also can be found at leanin.org/47percentcounts.

“It is a profound injustice that Latinas contribute so much to our economy and in return are paid less than just about everyone else,” said Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook and founder of LeanIn.Org. “The consequences of making 47 percent less than white men and 31 percent less than white women are significant for millions of Latinas and their families. We need to take real action to address the discrimination that Latinas and other women of color face and make sure every woman is paid fairly and treated equally.”

With the help of adidas, Lyft, P&G, and Reebok—all leaders in the push for equality in the workplace—LeanIn.Org is asking people to think about the impact of getting 47 percent less on November 1.

At adidas and Reebok stores across the country and on adidas.com and reebok.com, customers will see the messages of #47PercentCounts on items from purchase receipts to shopping bags. Lyft is asking customers how they would feel if their trip ended with 47 percent left to go. Salesforce is providing the financial support for events hosted by members of our Lean In Circles community to raise awareness of the Latina pay gap. And P&G sponsored a video that shows the everyday impact of the pay gap on Latinas and their families.

In addition to the 47 percent pay gap, Latinas face barriers in the workplace. Compared to white women, Latinas receive less support from managers, get less access to senior leaders, and are promoted more slowly. The unique challenges faced by Latinas—and women of color more broadly—are examined in LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Company’s annual Women in the Workplace study.

“Latinas face biases for being women and for being people of color—and many face additional discrimination for being immigrants,” said Rachel Thomas, president of LeanIn.Org. “These compounding biases contribute to the Latina pay gap and help explain the inequality Latinas experience in the workplace. More people—and more employers—need to understand the barriers Latinas face so they can take steps to level the playing field. We’re grateful to our partners and the Lean In community for helping raise awareness.”

LeanIn.Org and SurveyMonkey’s research, in partnership with UnidosUS, also shows that even when people know there’s a pay gap, it’s bigger than they realize. More than half of people who are aware of the Latina pay gap underestimate its size. The research also points to a lack of awareness of the discrimination Latinas experience. Forty-five percent of white men think obstacles to advancement for Latinas are gone, but only 30 percent of Latinas agree. Moreover, 73 percent of white men think that racism, sexism, or both are uncommon in their company—yet 51 percent of Latinas say they’ve experienced discrimination at work.

“In addition to racism and sexism in the workplace, divisive perceptions around immigration present yet another barrier. Half of Americans say the current immigration climate has an influence on the pay gap—a number that rises to seven in ten among Latinas,” said SurveyMonkey’s Director of Research, Sarah Cho. “This data sheds light on a topic often not discussed in the workplace, and we hope it drives conversations on how companies can break through these obstacles.”

“UnidosUS is pleased to join our partners in this campaign to bring awareness to the wage disparities that exist for Latina women at all income levels. We are hoping to raise public awareness in very visual ways so that the general public can understand just how unjust it is for Latina women to make on average only 53 cents to every dollar that white non-Hispanic men are paid. This affects our ability to care for our families, and we urge everyone to join us in the push for equal pay for equal work,” said Janet Murguia, president and CEO of UnidosUS.

To further bring the impact of the pay gap to life, LeanIn.Org collaborated with Latina illustrator Christine Suggs to create a series of cartoons that highlight the unfairness of the pay gap for Latinas. Additionally, LeanIn.Org is releasing a video of Latinas and their families—many from our Lean In Circles community—explaining what earning less means for them. When asked what equal pay would mean in their lives, one woman says she could pay off her student loans and mortgage; another says closing the gap is “two times, maybe three times as important” for her all-women household; and a mother tells her daughter the money could put her and her brother through college.

Their sentiments are supported by a large body of research that underscores the benefits of equal pay for Latinas. More than half of Latina mothers are the primary breadwinners for their households, and the pay gap means less money for their families. If Latinas were paid fairly, the average Latina would earn more than $1 million more over the course of her career.

At leanin.org/47percentcounts visitors can show their support for #47PercentCounts, watch our campaign video, and see the Latina pay gap “by the numbers.” In addition, business leaders and managers can learn what they can do to close the pay gap in their companies, and women can find expert tips and tricks for negotiating more effectively.

With the help of large-scale distribution and advertising partners—including Facebook, Instagram, PayPal, and SoFi—#47PercentCounts is also reaching millions of people online.

KEY FINDINGS FROM THE 2018 LATINA EQUAL PAY SURVEY CONDUCTED BY LEANIN.ORG AND SURVEYMONKEY IN PARTNERSHIP WITH UNIDOSUS:

Too many people don’t know that Latinas are paid less. 30% of Americans are not aware that, on average, Latinas are paid less than white men.

Even when people know there’s a pay gap, it’s bigger than they realize. On average, Latinas are paid 47% less than white men, which amounts to more than $1 million lost over the course of a typical career. 57% of people who are aware of this gap underestimate its size.

People are overly optimistic about the state of Latinas. 45% of white men think obstacles to advancement for Latinas are gone, but only 30% of Latinas agree. Moreover, 73% of white men think that racism, sexism or both are uncommon in their company—yet 51% of Latinas say they’ve experienced discrimination at work.

Almost everyone agrees that earning less is a huge problem. 85% of Americans think it would be a major problem or crisis if they earned 50% less money. Yet compared to white men, Latinas face this pay gap every day.

When people know there’s a pay gap, they think it’s unfair. When presented with information that Latinas on average are paid 47% less than white men, 72% of Americans think it’s not fair.

Many people believe that prejudice plays a role in the gap. 68% of Americans believe that bias against immigrants is a factor in the pay gap Latinas experience.

The pay gap between Latinas and white women is even less understood. On average, Latinas are paid 31% less than white women. Yet 42% of Americans—and almost as many hiring managers—think Latinas and white women are paid equally. And 75% of working Americans think no gap exists between Latinas and white women in their own organizations.

QUOTES FROM PARTNER COMPANIES:

“We believe in a world where all people are treated equally,” said Karen Parkin, Chief HR Officer and adidas Executive Board Member. “adidas and Reebok are partnering with LeanIn.Org to raise awareness that Latinas on average are paid 47 percent less than men in the U.S. for the same work. Together, we have the power to ignite conversation and create meaningful change for women everywhere.”

“It’s critical for organizations to highlight the pay discrepancies that exist with Latina women,” said Veronica Juarez, Lyft’s Area Vice President of Social Enterprise and executive sponsor of UpLyft Unidos, Lyft’s Latinx employee resource group. “It is only through these conversations and subsequent actions that women will be paid equally.”

“At P&G we believe in gender equality, and we support Lean In’s efforts to advocate for equal pay for Latina women in the U.S.,” said Carolyn Tastad, Group President, North America and Executive Sponsor for P&G’s gender equality efforts. “At P&G, fair pay practices and an equitable workplace are core company beliefs and essential to our long-term success.”

About LeanIn.Org

An initiative of the Sheryl Sandberg & Dave Goldberg Family Foundation, LeanIn.Org works to help women achieve their ambitions and create a more equal world. LeanIn.Org offers inspiration and support through an online community, free education materials, and Lean In Circles, small groups of peers who meet regularly to learn and grow together. The Lean In community includes more than two million women and men and 40,000 Lean In Circles in 169 countries. The Sheryl Sandberg & Dave Goldberg Family Foundation, which also runs OptionB.Org, is a private operating nonprofit organization under IRS section 501(c)(3).

Contact: press@leanin.org

SurveyMonkey Press Contact
Teresa Brewer
650-223-8310
teresab@surveymonkey.com