Please tell us what you think - you can find out more at www.forster.co.nz

Complete Our Caring Network

When we have an injury or impairment, we want to know we will get the care and support we need. Whether we experience an illness, accident or trauma we all want to be treated with dignity. We want to be supported to have the best life we can.

We want to know that those we love will be supported to continue to work, teach, communicate, care for others, find happiness and thrive in our communities.

A sustainable system

We need support from people in government so we can improve the quality of life for New Zealanders in the long term and improve the situation for people who currently feel trapped and hurt by the system. To do this we need a caring and inclusive disability system designed to serve all people, regardless of impairment. A system shaped around our people and our future wellbeing.

Right now this isn’t the case for everyone in New Zealand. Our loved ones get different levels of care and support depending on how their impairments were caused. We have different systems: ACC and everything else, which lead to very different outcomes for our people. This is not fair, and it’s not how it was intended to work. Right now we have a chance to change that, to bring the original idea to life and build a fairer system that we can all depend on.

So how did we get here?

The system we have is incomplete and it is causing harm
It works for some people, but not for others. People receive different standards of care. This includes different treatment, rehabilitation and income support based on how they got their injury or impairment. Families are expected to pick up what people in government choose not to provide. This was not how our system was supposed to work.

In New Zealand in 1967, the Royal Commission suggested a ground-breaking approach: a social insurance scheme to care for people with impairment. No matter how someone got an impairment, how old they were or whether they were working, they would receive ongoing care and support from a single system.

Until now, people in government have chosen not to follow this plan. Over the years our leaders have chosen a two-tiered system. High quality care and support is available to people who experience impairment and disability through an accident. Others are left to struggle in systems not set up for their needs.

Its like an unfinished transport network and this impacts on people and families

Our system is like a city with an unfinished transport network. In this city, people in some parts of the network can’t go where they need to. There are no footpaths, roads, taxis, bus routes or cycle lanes, for them and bus routes or roads weren’t built near their homes. Others have infrastructure built to their front door and any vehicle they need. It means some people can get to where they want, while others, for reasons out of their control, are stuck. They cannot travel anywhere at all.

Too many people are dealing with a substandard, unkind, even harmful system. This experience comes because their impairment was present at birth, caused by cancer or depression, or their claim with ACC was declined. It does not make sense to separate these systems. This unfinished network pushes people into stressful experiences between various systems that can harm them. We can change this network. We can maximise health for all people. We can minimise the stressful experiences coming from our incomplete and fragmented support system.

It is time to complete the support network and improve people’s lives

Now is the time to act. This is an idea whose time has come. We would like to know what you think. Your responses to these six quick questions will remain private and confidential. The results will be used publicly to start a conversation but there will be no identifying personal information included.

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WHAT DO YOU WANT PEOPLE IN GOVERNMENT TO DO?

1. Do you think people in the government should:

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THE BARRIERS

2. What do you think are the main barriers to building a single integrated system? (you can choose more than one)

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THE BENEFITS? 

3. What do you think are the main benefits of building a single integrated system?

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* ACCIDENT

4. Think about people who have an impairment or disability that DID result from an accident (e.g they had a fall at home).

What is important to you about the way people in government treat and respond to people in such circumstances?

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NON-ACCIDENT

5. Think about people who have an impairment or disability that DID NOT result from an accident (e.g they have cancer, long term depression, were born with impairments, or have a chronic illness).

What is important to you about the way people in government treat and respond to people in such circumstances?

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6. Thinking about people who have an impairment or disability that DID NOT result from an accident (e.g they have cancer, long term depression, were born with impairments, or have a chronic illness).

What do you believe people in government should provide in such circumstances?

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