Thank you for taking the first steps towards helping the Michigan Humane Society (MHS) improve and save animal lives.

Please provide the below information to help us better understand your fostering interests. We do not share information outside of MHS.

If you have any questions or concerns about any of the information please do not hesitate to call or email the Volunteer Programs Department.

Laura Kniffen, Foster Program Supervisor
lkniffen@michiganhumane.org (248) 283-5645

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1. Contact Information

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2. Are you 18 years or older?

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3. We believe our foster animals deserve the best possible care including regular vet visits. Foster parents should expect frequent transportation to and from the adoption center for pickups, vet visits, and drop offs. Will you have consistent, reliable transportation?

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4. We would not expect a foster parent to drive longer than an hour for a vet visit, or in case of needing an emergency vet appointment, we would like for you to be close. Do you live within one hour of one of our three main MHS locations (Detroit, Rochester Hills, or Westland)?

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5. What type of animal you decide to foster, how old they are, or what medical needs they have, will depend on how often you need to bring them to see the vet or for a routine care appointment. Most appointments are available M-F between 9-5, with limited appointments on Wednesday evenings and Saturdays. How often will you be able to commit to traveling to the animal care centers for appointments?

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6. Which MHS facility would you prefer to use for primary vet care?

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7. Animals may come into the shelter with different types of parasites (worms, fleas, etc.). While our shelter medicine team does their best to identify and treat all parasites upon arrival to the shelter, it can take more than one treatment to completely resolve an infestation. If you choose to foster, your personal pets at home may be exposed to fleas or other parasites. We recommend your pets at home receive regular preventatives. Do you understand and accept this risk associated with fostering?

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8. MHS recommends keeping your animals separate from foster animals for at least a 10-day quarantine period prior to any introductions. However, these precautions still cannot guarantee that illness may not still spread. Do you understand and accept the fact that pets in your home (if any) may become ill by exposure to a foster animal? 

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9. Foster needs, appointments, and pick-ups are regularly scheduled through email. Do you have reliable access to the internet for obtaining information about available foster animals?

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10. From the list below, please select the option that best applies to you:

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11. Are you a staff member of Michigan Humane Society?

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12. Do you rent or own your residence?

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13. In which kind of residence do you reside?

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14. Describe your backyard

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15. Who do you live with?

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16. Are all members of your household aware and supportive of your interest in fostering?

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17. How did you learn about the MHS Foster Volunteer role?

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18. If you are applying to foster a specific animal, what is the animal's name, how did you hear about this animal, and why are you interested in fostering this specific animal? (If not for a specific animal, do not answer)

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19. Why are you interested in fostering?

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20. Do you currently or have you ever fostered animals from another rescue/ animal group? Please note: MHS asks that you do not have a foster animal from another group in your home at the same time as a foster from MHS.

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21. The MHS foster caregiver role requests that you are able to foster regularly, trying not to take a break between fosters longer than 6 months at a time. Would you be able to make this commitment?

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22. Please list any factors that may limit your foster work.

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23. Which species of animals are you most interested in fostering? Please note: the majority of the animals' needing foster care are canine and feline.

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24. The animals who need foster care often have medical conditions or may need behavioral modification in order to prepare them for adoption. Please indicate below which special needs you are able to take into your care. Please note: any canine or feline is at risk of URI, and those cases make up the majority of the need, so we ask that you are willing to care for this condition.

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25. Would you be interested in fostering an animal for an owner who is temporarily unable to care for them due to a medical condition or hospital stay?

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26. Do you have pets of your own?

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27. If you own pets please provide your veterinarian's name and contact number.

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28. Are all of your current personal pets (dogs and cats only) altered (spay or neutered)?

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29. Are all of your current personal pets (dogs and cats) up to date on vaccinations?

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30. Have any animals in your home ever been diagnosed with a serious contagious disease like parvo virus? If so, when?

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31. Please list any special training or experience you may have in animal handling or care.
(Example: Sunrise Vet Center, 2006-2007, vet tech)

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32. If you do not have animal handling experience, would you be interested in doing an in-person training for signs of stress and animal handling? This could also include showing how to administer different types of medication to animals.

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33. MHS requires a phone call orientation for all new foster volunteers. Please check the box that best represents your availability.

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34. Would you like to be notified when your foster animal has been adopted?

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35. MHS must opt for Humane Euthanasia in cases of severe illnesses or behaviors that are unsafe to go into the community. In some circumstances, foster animals may become extremely sick or have serious behavioral concerns leading MHS to determine humane euthanasia is the best option for them. Would you like to be notified of this decision beforehand? Please note: we do our best to contact foster caregivers that prefer to be notified, however, some cases are time sensitive, and MHS reserves the right to proceed at any time in the best interest of the animal.

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36. Do you have any questions or concerns about the foster volunteer role?

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