Cast your vote now!

The ISN congratulates all the filmmakers for their submissions, and thanks them for making the ISN Community Film Event such an engaging experience. The ISN Jury selected 7 finalists.
Who wins? You choose! Vote for your favorite by Saturday February 26, 2022 at midnight MYT!
The nominees are:

For Some the Wait Never Ends
Submitted by:
J. Meyyappan (Senior Resident, Nephrology, Lucknow, India), N. Prasad, V. Vamsidhar, S. Sabarinath  (Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Nephrology, Lucknow, India)


Summary
In Uttar Pradesh, India, awareness about cadaveric transplantation and public approach towards organ donation is poor, in spite of unfortunately high incidents of death due to road traffic accidents. This film tells the story of Mr. Saad Ahmad Khan, a 26 year old, long term dialysis patient who has survived a cardiac arrest, battles visual impairment and familial chronic kidney disease ( leading to his close family members being rejected as potential donors). He pushes limits to excel in life while he awaits cadaveric transplantation. The excitement and anxiety the family faces every time the phone bell rings is way beyond imagination. His earnest question to us, "How long should I wait?", prompted the filmmakers to make this film. They hope to increase the awareness about organ donation by showing the struggles of a patient waiting for an organ.
This film was made in December 2021.



Ilan Lavi Donates a Kidney - And Gets a Happiness Transplant
Submitted by:
W. Wasser (Leumit Health Care, Department of Nephrology, Jerusalem, Israel)


Summary
A major feature of clinical nephrology practice in Israel has been the increasing availability of altruistic kidney transplants over the past number of years. This effort has been largely the result of one organization, Matnat Chaim and the effort of one man, Rabbi Yeshayahu Heber. Rabbi Heber started the organization ~11 years ago after successfully obtaining a kidney transplant for himself. Rabbi Heber passed away suddenly last year of coronavirus infection and the organization has continued stronger than ever under the direction of his wife. This short film is the story of one man who benefited. I wish to publicize this with the hope that other organizations might emulate these activities. This film including subtitles was just completed specifically for the WCN.


Alport Story: From Personal Isolation to International Collaboration for Kidney Care
Submitted by:
S. Gear (Alport UK, Patient- Patient Advocacy Group, Oxford, United Kingdom), R. Lenno (Manchester University, Wellcome Centre for Cell-Matrix Research, Manchester, United Kingdom), S. Clarke (Alport UK, Patient- Filmmaker and Action Sports Enthusiast, Reading, United Kingdom), P. Walker (Alport UK, Patient, London, United Kingdom), J. Zhang (China Alport Patient Organisation, Patient, Shanghai, China), V. Fronterè (Associazione Sindrome di Alport- A.S.A.L Onlus, Patient, Siena, Italy), A. Zealey Smith (Alport UK, Patient, Southampton, United Kingdom), N.R.H. Hassan (Alport UK, Patient, Manchester, United Kingdom), A. Jardin (Alport Syndrome Foundation, Patient, New York, United States) Y. Cai (China Alport Patient Organisation, Patient, Beijing, China)

Summary
Alport Syndrome (AS) is an inherited condition that can cause kidney failure, deafness and eye abnormalities. Around 1 in 10,000 people are affected; potentially 750,000 people world-wide. AS particularly affects young people at an age when they are most vulnerable; typically starting with hearing loss in childhood, followed by declining kidney function in teenage years. Many patients will need a kidney transplant or dialysis as young adults. To improve kidney care and develop treatments for Alport Syndrome, Alport UK’s strategy is to engage the best experts around the world and bring patients (particularly young patients), clinicians, laboratory scientists and pharmaceutical companies together, in immersive workshops, to collaboratively develop new ideas to improve kidney care and treatments. This video, filmed between 2020 and 2022, was written and produced by young people living with Alport Syndrome, celebrates the highlights from the unique collaboration and international workshops, starting with the important focus to connect patients and reduce the feeling of isolation living with a rare kidney disease. Alport UK believes that all young Alport patients should have the opportunity to explore and understand the science behind their condition and be empowered by the expertise available. Encouraging them to take ownership of their condition builds vital confidence, resilience, and alleviates transition issues that arise during the move from pediatric to adult services. As a community they can mobilize public awareness and collectively drive research and innovation. Pioneering ‘pilot’ workshops in collaboration with the University of Manchester (funded by the Wellcome Trust) demonstrated the power of connecting young Alport patients with researchers, to help the patients understand various aspects of kidney care, dialysis and transplantation. These pilot workshops were then scaled and applied to the international workshops to engage a wider group of patients in kidney care.
The filmmaker patient, Sam Clarke, worked with Alport UK to set up the Don’t Wait Fund to encourage young people with AS to take up a new sport or hobby that gets them outside and to help them explore new activities to help them live their lives to the full and reduce the feeling of being defined by their kidney condition. The community and friendships grow stronger from the fun and shared learning together. Patients take responsibility for their condition and learn how to look after their precious kidneys. The young people are keen to connect with a wider group of countries and collaborate to help the 850 million people living with CKD have a brighter future.


Together We Can Change Lives
Submitted by:
M. Canales (Fundacion Luz y Vida, NGO, Tegucigalpa, Honduras)


Summary
A short film about the patients in Honduras who live day to day with Kidney Deficiency 


Anthony's Story. Nocturnal Dialysis: This Game-Changing-Service Puts Patients at The Centre of Their Care, Supporting Them to Access Treatment When and How it Suits Them
 Submitted by:
J. Skewes, S. Gleeson, S. Morris, S. Govindarajulu, (Queensland Health, Darling Downs Kidney Service- Toowoomba Hospital- Darling Downs Hospital and Health Service, Toowoomba, Australia) B. Judd (Queensland Health, CEQ. Engage- Clinical Excellence Queensland, Brisbane, Australia), C. Mears, A. Salisbury (Queensland Health, Advancing Kidney Care 2026- Clinical Excellence Queensland, Brisbane, Australia)


Summary
Nocturnal Hemodialysis is a home-based dialysis model of care that supports an individual’s self-management, quality of life and health outcomes. The Darling Downs Kidney Service, a regional service in Queensland, Australia, provides training and assistance for patients who choose, and are suitable for, this model of care. Anthony is a young indigenous man with kidney failure. To support him and other patients that do not have suitable accommodation for home-based hemodialysis, the service has made available their newly built home-training dialysis unit for the use of independent patients’ after-hours. This novel approach is allowing more patients access to nocturnal dialysis, with all its inherent benefits.
The Advancing Kidney Care 2026 (AKC2026) team first heard of Anthony, his difficult dialysis journey, and about how his service was supporting him towards his ultimate goal of kidney transplantation in 2020. Anthony's outstanding renal team made this model of care (and film) possible by being innovative, specialized, and dedicated, by supporting patients to access care that responds to their personal situation and that is their choice. By sharing this film, we and the Darling Downs Kidney Service hope to shine a light on possibilities for care, whilst acknowledging Anthony for his amazing resilience and drive. At time of submission, Anthony had been made active on the Queensland Kidney Transplant waitlist.


Pregnancy in Dialysis Story
Submitted by:
J. Santacruz (Clinica de los Riñones Menydial, Nephrology- dialysis, Quito, Ecuador), C. Santacruz (Clinica de los Riñones Menydial, Nephrology- dialysis, Quito, Ecuador,Clínica de los Riñones Menydial, Nephrology, Quito, Ecuador)


Summary

The objective of the video was to show human motivations that stimulate patients to keep fighting and living despite all the problems and imperfections of standard hemodialysis. By this way we want to educate renal patients by showing that there are several reasons for living, enjoy life and that it is possible to live well with chronic kidney disease as well as to give birth children even in rural or indigenous zones where poorness and hunger are present daily.


Kidney Transplantation: New Life New Hope
Submitted by:
F. Nobi, T.S. Kashem, N.A.S. Begum, S.U.Z. Arefin, H.U. Rashid, S. Nomany (Kidney Foundation Hospital and Research Institute, Nephrology and Transplantation, Dhaka, Bangladesh).


Summary

A successful kidney transplant can help a patient live longer with improved quality of life. It is like being blessed with gift of life twice. A new life and new hope where patient can get his own normal life back all over again. This story is about a man who was diagnosed as a case of FSGS with hypertension since 2006. He was reasonably fine till 2015 after which he started haemodialysis. On 2017 he received renal transplantation from his sister. He returned to his normal daily life and his sister is doing fine as well. He became father of his second child after renal transplantation.
This film was made in November 2020.The reason behind making this film was to raise the awareness regarding renal transplantation. As this is the only treatment modality in end stage kidney disease where patients recover all functions of kidney with an improved quality of life. More improved life with more control over daily activities. It also eliminates the need for dialysis.


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