Stream erosion and restoration background (Questions 1-2)

As part of Arlington County’s efforts to protect our local streams, Gulf Branch was identified as a high priority for stream restoration because of habitat degradation, active erosion and infrastructure concerns. Funding for design was allocated through the Capital Improvement Plan in 2018.

This project will create a stable stream channel to accommodate storm flows, protect exposed pipes and other infrastructure, and reverse the damage to the stream valley. The project is being managed by Arlington Department of Environmental Services.

Thank you for providing your feedback and input! If you have any questions, feel free to contact us at lwhitesell@arlingtonva.us or tasfaw@arlingtonva.us. For more information, please see: https://projects.arlingtonva.us/projects/gulf-branch-stream-restoration

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* 1. In response to increased runoff from roads, roofs, and parking lots, stream banks erode and get steeper and wider (see photos below). Which of the following effects of runoff have you seen in Arlington streams (select all that apply)?

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Left to right: Steep banks, trees falling in stream, exposed pipe. Last photo: steep banks, exposed tree roots and infrastructure.

Left to right: Steep banks, trees falling in stream, exposed pipe. Last photo: steep banks, exposed tree roots and infrastructure.

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* 2. Stream restoration creates a new, stable stream using techniques like step pools, meanders (natural curves), and reconnecting the stream to the floodplain (see photos below). Which of the following have you seen in Arlington (select all that apply)?

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Left to right: Step pools, meanders and a stream connected to its floodplain

Left to right: Step pools, meanders and a stream connected to its floodplain
(In Arlington, stream restoration can be seen at Donaldson Run, Windy Run, and Four Mile Run downstream of Mount Vernon Avenue.)

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