Thank you for agreeing to participate in this study of how our early lives may have an impact on our experience as an expatriate. Your responses will be completely anonymous,  If you have questions at any point in the survey, please contact:

Dr. Anne P. Copeland
Executive Director, The Interchange Institute
copeland@interchangeinstitute.org

Please continue with this survey if you:
- are 18 years old or older
- are now living, or have ever lived as an adult, in a country other than your passport country*
- have spent a total of at least six months outside your passport country as an adult

* "Passport country" refers to the country of your citizenship when you were a child (whether or not you had a passport then). This may also be your current country of citizenship (if you have not changed your citizenship since then). If you were a dual citizen when you were a child, please pick the country you feel you know best in answering these survey questions.

* 1. It will help us understand your experience to know a bit about you. First, in what year were you born?

* 2. What is your race/ethnicity and/or national ancestry?

* 3. What is your gender?

* 4. What is your nationality? (If you are a dual national, please list both countries.)

* 5. Were you born a citizen of that nation?

* 6. Did you ever live outside your passport country AS A CHILD (age 18 or under)?

* 7. Which of the following is true for you?

Next, we are interested in whether, when you were a child (age 18 and younger), you ever lived for 6 months or more in a situation when you experienced yourself as different from the other people around you, in any of the ways listed below (or other ways you can think of). NOTE - this experience of difference may have happened in your passport country. Here are some examples:
• [Which region of the country you were from] “From age 9 to 12, we moved from New York to Atlanta and I was the only northerner in my elementary school (about 400 kids).”
• [Religion] “In my middle school, most of the families were Evangelical Protestant. Mine was one of about 30% who were Catholic.”
• [Language spoken at home] “All the time I was growing up, my family was one of 10 families in my town of 150,000 who spoke German at home.”
• [Income level] “From age 3 to 12, we lived in a small, rural poor town where my father was the doctor and earned much more money than almost any other resident.”
• [Political beliefs] “I grew up in a town where almost everyone is a liberal Democrat; my family was Republican – maybe part of a 25% minority.”
• [Work status] “When I was in high school (about 2000 students), my dad became a stay-at-home dad – one of only three that I knew of.”
• [Race and ethnicity] “Until I was in high school, my brother and I were the only Americans of Asian descent in our neighborhood and schools.”
• [Exposure to other cultures] “My mother was head of our local high school exchange program so we always had lots of kids from other countries around our house and I remember feeling like I knew more about the rest of the world than all my friends."

* 8. When you were a child, were you (or your family) different from most others in your community on any of these dimensions? Check all that are true for you. We will ask for more detail about these differences in Question 9.

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