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Page: Agile Principles Revisited
1. How important is this principle that comes from the original Agile Principles authored in 2001 for agile teams in 2010? (1=not very important, 5=essential, the team is not agile if they don't follow this principle)
 answered question333
 
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2
 1 (Not important)2345 (Very important)No opinionRating
Count
Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software.0.6% (2)2.7% (9)4.2% (14)24.8% (82)66.8% (221)0.9% (3)331
Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage.0.3% (1)2.4% (8)11.4% (38)34.9% (116)49.7% (165)1.2% (4)332
Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale.0.3% (1)1.5% (5)3.6% (12)28.1% (93)65.6% (217)0.9% (3)331
Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.0.9% (3)5.4% (18)17.8% (59)32.0% (106)42.9% (142)0.9% (3)331
Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done.1.2% (4)3.3% (11)5.1% (17)28.9% (96)59.3% (197)2.1% (7)332
The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation.2.1% (7)5.4% (18)14.2% (47)32.6% (108)45.0% (149)0.6% (2)331
Working software is the primary measure of progress.1.2% (4)3.0% (10)5.2% (17)23.9% (79)66.1% (218)0.6% (2)330
Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely.0.6% (2)5.4% (18)16.3% (54)39.0% (129)36.3% (120)2.4% (8)331
Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility.0.9% (3)3.3% (11)9.4% (31)34.5% (114)49.4% (163)2.4% (8)330
Simplicity -- the art of maximizing the amount of work not done -- is essential.1.5% (5)4.2% (14)14.2% (47)30.4% (101)45.5% (151)4.2% (14)332
The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams.0.9% (3)10.9% (36)26.9% (89)32.3% (107)26.6% (88)2.4% (8)331
At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.0.3% (1)2.1% (7)7.0% (23)30.8% (101)58.5% (192)1.2% (4)328
What's missing? What other principles would you add to the Agile Principles? Any other comments?
 
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Page: Agile Practices
1. What practices are essential for a team to be considered agile? (1=not important; 5=essential, a team is not agile unless they do this practice)
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 1 (Low Importance)2345 (High importance)No opinionRating
Count
Stand up/Scrum meeting1.8% (5)6.9% (19)19.1% (53)30.3% (84)40.1% (111)1.8% (5)277
Planning Poker14.4% (40)19.5% (54)28.2% (78)20.9% (58)9.0% (25)7.9% (22)277
Requirements written as informal stories3.6% (10)13.3% (37)25.5% (71)36.7% (102)18.3% (51)2.5% (7)278
"Just-in-time" requirements elaboration1.5% (4)4.4% (12)21.9% (60)44.5% (122)22.6% (62)5.1% (14)274
Acceptance tests written by product manager6.5% (18)14.9% (41)29.3% (81)32.6% (90)12.0% (33)4.7% (13)276
Automated unit testing1.4% (4)2.9% (8)9.8% (27)31.5% (87)52.5% (145)1.8% (5)276
Test-driven development unit testing0.7% (2)5.8% (16)20.7% (57)35.9% (99)34.8% (96)2.2% (6)276
Informal design (no big design up front)3.2% (9)8.7% (24)24.5% (68)42.2% (117)19.5% (54)1.8% (5)277
Emergent design0.7% (2)5.4% (15)25.4% (70)42.0% (116)18.8% (52)7.6% (21)276
Release planning2.2% (6)8.7% (24)20.9% (58)36.1% (100)29.2% (81)2.9% (8)277
Pair programming10.1% (28)11.9% (33)35.3% (98)27.3% (76)12.9% (36)2.5% (7)278
Continuous integration0.4% (1)2.5% (7)8.3% (23)30.2% (84)57.2% (159)1.4% (4)278
Retrospective1.1% (3)4.3% (12)17.4% (48)29.0% (80)46.7% (129)1.4% (4)276
Task planning5.1% (14)15.5% (43)26.7% (74)34.3% (95)14.8% (41)3.6% (10)277
Refactoring1.4% (4)4.0% (11)18.4% (51)30.3% (84)42.2% (117)3.6% (10)277
Coding standard4.7% (13)16.3% (45)26.8% (74)32.2% (89)15.9% (44)4.0% (11)276
Collective code ownership1.1% (3)3.6% (10)15.5% (43)32.9% (91)44.8% (124)2.2% (6)277
Iteration reviews/demos0.4% (1)2.2% (6)13.1% (36)33.6% (92)49.3% (135)1.5% (4)274
Short iterations (30 days or less)0.7% (2)1.5% (4)10.9% (30)25.1% (69)60.7% (167)1.1% (3)275
"Potentially shippable" features at the end of each iteration1.4% (4)3.6% (10)9.1% (25)35.1% (97)49.6% (137)1.1% (3)276
"Whole" multidisciplinary team with one goal0.7% (2)2.5% (7)11.2% (31)36.7% (102)47.1% (131)1.8% (5)278
Small teams (12 people or less)1.4% (4)6.9% (19)22.8% (63)30.4% (84)35.1% (97)3.3% (9)276
Synchronous communication (face-to-face, video conference, conference call, instant messaging)0.7% (2)3.6% (10)8.7% (24)33.0% (91)51.8% (143)2.2% (6)276
Team documentation focuses on decisions rather than planning2.9% (8)7.9% (22)28.9% (80)37.2% (103)13.0% (36)10.1% (28)277
Co-located team4.7% (13)11.2% (31)25.3% (70)36.1% (100)20.6% (57)2.2% (6)277
"Done" criteria0.0% (0)2.2% (6)9.7% (27)30.6% (85)55.4% (154)2.2% (6)278
Embracing changing requirements0.4% (1)2.2% (6)11.6% (32)38.3% (106)46.2% (128)1.4% (4)277
Task planning7.7% (21)13.1% (36)28.8% (79)31.8% (87)13.9% (38)4.7% (13)274
Team velocity3.2% (9)10.8% (30)30.7% (85)33.2% (92)19.1% (53)2.9% (8)277
Burndown charts9.1% (25)18.8% (52)26.8% (74)28.3% (78)12.3% (34)4.7% (13)276
Configuration management3.2% (9)8.3% (23)20.9% (58)29.2% (81)30.3% (84)7.9% (22)277
Automated tests are run with each build0.7% (2)3.6% (10)10.1% (28)28.6% (79)54.7% (151)2.2% (6)276
Kanban12.4% (34)20.0% (55)25.1% (69)18.9% (52)4.4% (12)19.3% (53)275
Stabilization iterations17.5% (48)19.6% (54)24.4% (67)21.8% (60)10.2% (28)6.5% (18)275
Sustainable pace0.4% (1)2.5% (7)14.9% (41)40.7% (112)40.0% (110)1.5% (4)275
Daily customer/product manager involvement1.5% (4)6.9% (19)20.4% (56)41.1% (113)28.7% (79)1.5% (4)275
"Complete" feature testing done during iteration1.1% (3)4.0% (11)16.8% (46)39.4% (108)37.2% (102)1.5% (4)274
Features in iteration are customer-visible/customer valued0.4% (1)2.5% (7)10.5% (29)36.1% (100)49.5% (137)1.1% (3)277
Timeboxing2.2% (6)6.5% (18)17.5% (48)34.2% (94)34.5% (95)5.1% (14)275
Test-driven development acceptance testing1.4% (4)10.1% (28)23.6% (65)39.1% (108)23.6% (65)2.2% (6)276
Code inspections11.3% (31)20.7% (57)27.3% (75)23.3% (64)13.1% (36)4.4% (12)275
Design inspections8.3% (23)18.8% (52)32.2% (89)23.6% (65)11.2% (31)5.8% (16)276
Negotiated scope0.4% (1)4.7% (13)15.3% (42)42.9% (118)33.1% (91)3.6% (10)275
Prioritized product backlog1.1% (3)3.3% (9)11.6% (32)28.6% (79)52.2% (144)3.3% (9)276
Ten minute build6.1% (17)13.3% (37)28.4% (79)30.2% (84)14.4% (40)7.6% (21)278
What's missing? What other practices are essential for agile teams?
 
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Page: Demographics
1. How long have you been doing agile software development?
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 Response
Percent
Response
Count
< 1 year
7.2%20
1-2 years
14.5%40
3-4 years
25.4%70
5-6 years
14.1%39
6-9 years
15.2%42
10 years or more
23.6%65

2. What continent do you develop software on?
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 Response
Percent
Response
Count
Antarctica 0.0%0
Africa
0.7%2
Asia
8.0%22
Europe
28.0%77
North America
58.5%161
South America
1.5%4
Australia
3.3%9

3. Please indicate all that apply to you.
 answered question190
 
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145
 Response
Percent
Response
Count
The entire product team is large (more than 30 people) though we may subdivide into smaller groups for the purposes of agile software development
55.8%106
Our team is not co-located but we all work in the same country.
34.2%65
Our team is not co-located but we all work on the same continent.
13.2%25
Our team is no co-located and we work from different continents.
48.4%92
Our team works on safety-critical projects.
15.8%30

4. If you would like us to notify you when a summary of the results are available, please provide your email address.
 answered question202
 
skipped question
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 Response
Count
 202

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