Chemistry Impact

 
1. The survey that you are about to take is part of an effort to understand how chemists place importance on published research. The researchers hope to observe some generalizable trends with respect to how respondents answer these questions. This survey is meant to reach trained chemists: graduate students, postdocs, faculty members, chemical professionals, and trained chemists currently working in a non-research capacity. You will be asked four questions in which you will rank articles from an issue of JACS according to different criteria. You will also be asked to input some very basic demographic information. You are will be provided with an opportunity not to answer the demographic questions.

The survey will maintain your anonymity and, in doing so, will minimize any risk that you, the respondent, may incur.

If you agree to take part in this survey and have your data analyzed as part of an anonymous data set, please click “yes” to the following question and proceed with the survey. If you do not with to take part in this survey, please exit from this browser window.

Do you agree that your submitted answers may be used by the researchers as described above?
2. What is your current occupation?
3. What is your age?
4. What subdiscipline of chemistry would you say your training is most closely associated with?
5. This question asks you to very briefly evaluate articles in issue 31 of the Journal of the American Chemical Society from 2003. Please click on the link to see authors, abstracts, and article content if this information would be important to the way you answer this question.

Which three papers in the issue do YOU think are the most 'significant' (your own definition of 'significant' is what is important here)?
6. This question asks you to very briefly evaluate articles in issue 31 of the Journal of the American Chemical Society from 2003. Please click on the link to see authors, abstracts, and article content if this information would be important to the way you answer this question.

Without looking up the numbers, which three papers do you think will have been cited the most to-date?
7. This question asks you to very briefly evaluate articles in issue 31 of the Journal of the American Chemical Society from 2003. Please click on the link to see authors, abstracts, and article content if this information would be important to the way you answer this question.

Which three papers would you most want to point out to other chemists?
8. This question asks you to very briefly evaluate articles in issue 31 of the Journal of the American Chemical Society from 2003. Please click on the link to see authors, abstracts, and article content if this information would be important to the way you answer this question.

Which three papers would you want to shout about from the rooftops (i.e., tell anybody about, not just chemists)?
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