For musicians, producers and sound-recordists the shift from analogue to digital cultures has been an incremental process. Early industry innovations and the availability of relatively cheap music and recording technology have meant that musicians can be seen as early adopters (adaptors) in the digital revolution.

How audio is captured, manipulated and presented in digital form has offered a fundamental shift in our perception of sound. If this is the case has there been a consequential loss of past processes, skills and understandings of the pre-digital?

This chapter looks to the thoughts and experiences musicians and sound-recordists to assess what it means to stay analogue or be digital.



Comparing and contrasting ‘analogue’ and ‘digital’ in auditory terms could you respond to whichever of these questions, or propositions, you feel most appropriate.


PLEASE FEEL FREE TO ANSWER AS MANY (OR FEW) QUESTIONS AS YOU WISH.

THE AIM IS TO SHARE YOUR OPINIONS AND EXPERIENCES

If you wish to remain anonymous please ignore name/email contact section

* 1. What do you feel has been lost as we have moved to predominantly digital forms of recording?

* 2. What do you feel has been gained?

* 3. What do you feel has been lost as we have moved to predominantly digital forms of playing back / listening to sound?

* 4. What do you feel has been gained?

* 5. What do you feel has been lost as we have moved to predominantly digital forms of performance / playing live/ DJ’ing?

* 6. What do you feel has been gained?

* 7. Are there any particular experiences that you've had that illustrate the analogue-digital debate?

* 8. Are there any other comments you'd like to make?

* 9. What name would you like to be credited with?

If you wish to remain anonymous please leave blank

* 10. Contact Details - email/mobile

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