All questions in this survey form should be answered for one particular child.

This survey is designed to see how MIND-Strengths (that is, strengths often seen in individuals with dyslexic traits) show up in persons aged 5-17.

By filling out this survey, you will be helping us develop a scoring system that will allow the strengths of young people to be identified in these areas. Because we have not yet developed a scoring scale, your scores will not be immediately available. However, when enough people have participated, we will be able to release a final survey version and scoring profile.

IMPORTANT: We need surveys to be completed NOT ONLY for young people with obvious DYSLEXIC traits or prior diagnoses, but also for those with either no obvious  or only mild dyslexic traits. So even families with no dyslexic members can help, as can non-dyslexic children from families with dyslexic parents or siblings.

Parents should fill this form out for their children, though they may (typically with older children) ask the child's opinions on the answers to the various questions. IMPORTANT: A SEPARATE SURVEY MUST BE FILLED OUT FOR EACH CHILD YOU WISH TO DESCRIBE. 

The personal/demographic information at the start of the survey is essential for developing the scoring scale. We will not keep any uniquely identifying information with the surveys, but we will ask for an email where we can contact you later with the results. Neither the surveys nor the personal information will be released to anyone outside of Dyslexic Advantage.

Please contact us at team@dyslexicadvantage.org if you have questions. And thank you for your help!

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* 1. What is the age of the young person described in this survey?

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* 2. Email address where we can contact you with follow up information and results:

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* 3. The sex of the person described in this survey is:

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* 4. Please choose the statement that best fits the person described in this survey:

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* 5. Please check the boxes  below to indicate areas of past or present special concern for the person described in this survey.

  Current Problem Past Problem (not now) Never a Problem Do Not Know
Learning letter sounds and blends
Decoding (sounding out) words
Reading common and familiar words by sight
Reading silently with good speed
reading aloud with good speed and accuracy
Understanding what is read
Reading endurance (able to stick with and complete reading assignments)
Avoids or dislikes reading
Spelling
Handwriting
Written punctuation or Capitalization
Speed of writing
Ability to communicate thoughts in writing
Difficulty completing assignments in a usual length of time
Difficulty completing tests in a usual length of time
Underperforming ability on tests or assignments

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* 6. Has the person described in this survey ever been taught using a program designed to help with dyslexia or reading problems either through special services at school, through a tutor or learning center, or at home?

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* 7. Has the person described in this survey taken the Neurolearning Dyslexia Screening Test App?

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* 8. If the answer to question 7 is "yes", what was the Total Dyslexia Risk range?

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* 9. This child is very good at building things (e.g., using Legos, building blocks, virtual building (e.g., Minecraft), 3D arts and crafts projects, marble runs, robotics kits, building models, dollhouse, artificial environments, putting together furniture or other kits, etc.).

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* 10. When assembling a kit (e.g., Legos, furniture, model) the child often does not have to look at instructions, but can tell how things go together just by looking at the pictures.

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* 11. The child's drawings often show 3D characteristics, such as perspective.

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* 12. The child's drawings often show simulated movements in space or time (e.g., vehicles moving, flying arrows, machine parts turning.

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* 13. The child sometimes makes drawings featuring detailed plans, designs, blueprints, or maps.

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* 14. The child sometimes makes drawings showing objects from multiple angles (including cross-sections, overhead and side views, etc.).

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* 15. The child is good at figuring out how machines or tools work.

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* 16. This statement is very true of the child: “She/he can just look at things and figure out how they work.”

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* 17. The child is good at figuring out problems with household plumbing, appliances, etc.

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* 18. The child is interested in organizing layout of furniture in the house.

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* 19. The child engages in 3D storytelling (e.g., complex play in 3D space with figurines, filmmaking with clay modeling, Legos, “action” enactments, etc) (either now, or for older children in their past).

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* 20. The child is good at route-finding in real environment (e.g., Once she/he has been some place once, they readily find the way around it again next time).

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* 21. The child has a special interest in sailing/boating or piloting airplanes.

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* 22. The child is very good at navigation and/or reading maps.

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* 23. The child has a good natural sense of direction.

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* 24. The child is good at reading topographical (3D) maps.

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* 25. The child is good at reading blueprints and imagining the 3D structures they represent.

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* 26. The child shows strengths in kinesthetic activities (complex body movement) such as dancing or sports.

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* 27. The child sometimes has difficulty describing in words what he/she envisions in mind.

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* 28. The child generally prefers pictures or diagrams to spoken or written instructions or explanations.

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* 29. The child often sees connections or relationships that other people miss (e.g., how things, people, events, etc., resemble each other, are alike, or are in other ways related or connected).

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* 30. The child often spots things that are missing or lacking (negative space thinking).

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* 31. The child often seems better at understanding the “big picture” than the “details”.

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* 32. The child is good at coming up with analogies or metaphors (ways of understanding or explaining things by showing how they are like something else).

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* 33. The child is good at spotting connections or relationships that make up a larger system.

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* 34. The child is good at detecting patterns in complex events or sets of data.

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* 35. The child often solves problems by approaching them in unique or unusual ways (i.e., different than those used by most other people).

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* 36. The child often performs tasks or solves problems using approaches or methods that she/he came up with herself/himself.

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* 37. The child often comes up with ways to use tools, objects, or techniques that are different from those for which they were designed or originally intended.

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* 38. When taught a new task or skill, the child can’t just learn it by rote, but has to “make sense of it” before being able to learn it.

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* 39. The child learns best by starting with the “big picture” or general overview before trying to start mastering the details.

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* 40. The child often seems confused by the importance or relevance of new details until things suddenly “click” and she/he can see the big picture.

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* 41. The child often has difficulty learning something until he/she can see the “point” or why it is important to learn it.

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* 42. The child enjoys especially “big picture” topics that try to explain the patterns or forces behind what happens in the world, like science, history, philosophy, etc.

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* 43. The child asks a lot of questions.

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* 44. The child often asks questions other people don’t ask.

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* 45. The child asks a lot of questions about “how” and “why”.

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* 46. The child is good at understanding things from another person (or animal’s) point of view.

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* 47. The child is good at “reading” other people (e.g., moods, feelings, responses, etc.)

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* 48. The child has a “clever” sense of humor which involves putting things together in surprising ways.

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* 49. The child is good at doing imitations of other people or animals (manner of acting or speaking, etc.).

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* 50. The child is good at inventing things.

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* 51. The child often creates art or inventions from “found” or random objects.

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* 52. The child is good with computers.

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* 53. The child likes to code or create computer programs.

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* 54. The child is a skilled or creative cook.

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* 55. The child is good at fashion design.

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* 56. The child creates collections or little “museums”.

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* 57. The child is interested in other cultures and how they differ from or relate to our own.

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* 58. The child is interested in nature.

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* 59. The child is interested in ecology.

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* 60. The child likes to design games or complex play scenarios.

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* 61. The child learns new concepts better through stories and examples than definitions or explanations.

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* 62. The child reasons better by using and comparing stories, cases, and examples than by using abstract concepts or definitions.

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* 63. When recalling past experiences, the child doesn’t just remember the facts, but seems to "relive" the experience and to have a very rich sense of the feelings, events, time, place, and reactions of the other participants.

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* 64. The child remembers things heard in conversations better than things read in books.

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* 65. The child remembers things heard in conversations better than things heard in the classroom.

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* 66. The child often has to use “special memory tricks” (like rhymes, songs, stories, etc.) to remember rote facts.

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* 67. Rote memory or simple repetition just doesn’t seem to work with this child when he/she has to memorize facts.

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* 68. When thinking about facts or events, the child imagines scenes or events in his/her mind, rather than just think about a verbal definition or set of facts.

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* 69. In defining abstract terms (like “justice” or “love”) the child is more likely to use an example or case rather than just give a verbal definition.

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* 70. The child is much better at remembering things she/he has done than things she/he has been told about.

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* 71. The child seems to notice and remember more things that were encountered by chance in the course of the day than most people.

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* 72. The child often seems to remember things encountered by chance better than things intentionally focused on in school.

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* 73. The child learns better by practical experience than formal instruction.

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* 74. The child seems especially good at remembering things he/she has done in the past, often in vivid detail

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* 75. The child seems especially good at remembering things he/she has done in the past, often in vivid detail.

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* 76. The child likes acting, role play, make believe, imaginary play.

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* 77. The child loves to listen to stories being told or read.