“Living Our Purpose:  Enrichment in Heritage” Trivia Questions

This year marks 400 years since the first Africans arrived in the British North American colonies as enslaved people in 1619. Despite the tragic adversity of inhumane circumstances and struggles suffered, however, African Americans have persevered and contributed significantly and substantially to the United States and the world.  This week’s trivia questions will focus on historical facts about civil rights activists who, in the face of prohibitions, injustices, and persecution have used their voices, talents, and gifts to push toward equality, freedom, and access to the American Dream for African Americans.  They worked to fulfill their purpose by contributing to attainment of civil rights for their people.  Please submit your responses to each question as directed.  A drawing will be conducted each week to select three participants to receive a gift.  Winning participants will be announced during the Taste of Heritage Fest on Sunday, February 24th.  Gifts will also be given at that time.

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* 1. This enslaved African-American preacher led the most significant slave uprising in American history. He and his band of followers launched a short, bloody, rebellion in Southampton County, Virginia in 1861. The militia quelled the rebellion and he was eventually hanged.

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* 2. After escaping slavery in Maryland, he became an American social reformer, orator, writer, statesman, and leader of the abolitionist movement in Massachusetts and New York, gaining note for his oratory and incisive antislavery writings. One of his most noted writings was “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?”

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* 3. Born into slavery, she was an American abolitionist who escaped and subsequently made some 13 missions to rescue approximately 70 enslaved people, family, and friends all while carrying a bounty on her head. In addition to being a “conductor” on the Underground Railroad, she was a nurse, Union spy and a women’s suffrage supporter.

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* 4. In 1909, he was selected to lead the National Association of Colored People (NAACP) which was founded in New York City by and became the country’s most influential civil rights organization for African Americans. He was the first African American to earn a doctorate at Harvard.

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* 5. He was an important figure in the Harlem Renaissance who made the African-American experience the subject of his writings, which ranged from poetry and plays to novels and newspaper columns. Some of his best-known writings include: “The Negro Speaks of Rivers,” “Harlem,” and The Weary Blues. He served as a newspaper correspondent (1937) during the Spanish Civil War.

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* 6. This early civil rights activist, leader of the NAACP, and leading figure in the creation of the Harlem Renaissance wrote the poem, “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” which was set to music by his brother, James Rosamond and became The Negro (Black) National Anthem.

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* 7. He became the first black athlete to play Major League Baseball in the 20th century when he took the field for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947 and distinguished himself as one of the game’s most talented and exciting player. He was also a vocal civil rights activist.

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* 8. This African-American leader, human rights activist, and prominent figure in the Nation of Islam articulated concepts of race pride and black nationalism in the 1950s and 60s. He exhorted blacks to cast off the shackles of racism “by any means necessary.”

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* 9. He was a Baptist minister and activist, first president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the youngest man to receive the Nobel Peace Prize, and America’s pre-eminent advocate of nonviolence and one of the greatest nonviolent leaders in world history.

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* 10. Please enter your contact information. 

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