The Dept. of Planning and Development Review is developing a new city-wide Master Plan, which is called Richmond 300: A Guide for Growth.  This survey is for you to provide your ideas on the Downtown Activity Center. For more information about Richmond 300 and to review and comment on the additional Activity Centers and draft maps and draft strategies, please visit richmond300.com/share.  Please encourage your friends, family, and neighbors to fill out the survey too. The surveys will close on November 3, 2019 at 11:59 P.M.

Activity Centers: A lot of the city won’t change at all in the next 20 years, but the Activity Centers are places where things could change - what do we want these areas to look like? What is the essential character of these areas going to be like?
Downtown Activity Center

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1. Did you know that there is an adopted plan, the Pulse Corridor Plan, that includes Downtown?

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2. The Downtown Activity Center includes many sub-areas. The Pulse Corridor Plan includes visions for 4 Station Areas that are within the Downtown Activity Center: 

Arts District: Located at the heart of the Downtown Arts District, this Pulse Station creates a hub of activity at the newest urban plaza on the Pulse Corridor, Maggie L. Walker Plaza. Historic buildings are preserved and complemented by denser development on vacant lots that generates more activity through a greater concentration of residents, shoppers, workers, and tourists who are attracted to the residential options, retail and restaurant destinations, jobs, and cultural attractions, including galleries, parks, museums, theaters, and other such destinations throughout Jackson Ward, Monroe Ward, and along W. Broad Street.

Convention Center: The gap in vibrant uses between the Arts District and the Government Center Stations is filled as vacant and underutilized parcels around the Convention Center are developed to include uses that enhance the Convention Center visitor experience and also provide for the daily needs of residents and workers in the area. Monroe Ward transforms into a denser, more complete neighborhood and more uses along Broad Street are created to serve these future residents. City-owned property fosters mixed-income redevelopment.

Government Center: The Government Center Station area continues to be one of the densest areas of the city with new development that matches the intensity of existing buildings but also includes active ground floor uses that enliven the sidewalks, and creates real opportunity to more fully engage the Virginia Biotechnology Research Park and VCU Medical Center campuses with the balance of Downtown. The area continues its evolution into a 24-hour neighborhood as more residents desire to live in the core of the city. City-owned property fosters mixed-income redevelopment

VCU Health: The VCU Health Station area is enhanced with improved pedestrian connections through the VCU Medical Center campus, while groundfloor uses and new public spaces generate activity at the pedestrian level. Opportunities for more residential and other uses transform the area from a medical center campus into a neighborhood in its own right.

Do you agree with the Pulse Corridor Plan's vision for these sub-areas? If not, why?

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3. What makes the Downtown Activity Center unique? How can we build on the existing assets of the Downtown Activity Center in the future?

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4. What do you want the Downtown Activity Center to be like in 20 years?

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5. What uses would you like to see in the Downtown Activity Center in the future? (check all that you would to see in this Activity Center)

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6. What transportation improvements need to happen in the Downtown Activity Center to make this a successful Activity Center?

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7. What other comments do you have about the future of the Downtown Activity Center?

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