Water Watchers supports grassroots groups who face many different kinds of threats to their local waters. One threat that may not be well known is aggregate extraction. This survey is to better understand what people know - or don't - about the aggregate industry, its environmental impacts, and its community impacts.
 
Most aggregate material extracted in gravel mining is used in the manufacture of cement and for the construction of roads, bridges, sewers and other infrastructure.

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* 1. Please select all that apply to the follow statements:

  I knew this already. I didn't know this. This surprises me. This does not surprise me. I am not interested in this information.
The cement industry produces 8% of global carbon emissions.
If the cement industry was a country, it would be the third largest emitter of CO2 globally.
The process of road construction and maintenance is a major contributor to climate change, as building more high-capacity roads leads to more driving.
Excavating new gravel pits and quarries contributes to global warming by destroying the natural environment and removing carbon sequestering wetlands, plants and soils.
The majority of gravel mining in Ontario - about 60-80% - is done by four multinational corporations with headquarters in Europe and Brazil.
 
There are more than 6000 pits and quarries in Ontario already licensed by the Ontario government to supply aggregate.

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* 2. How aware are you of the following impacts of gravel mining...

  Very aware Aware Somewhat aware Not aware
Gravel mining threatens groundwater supply and quality
Gravel mining blasts rocks which travel hundreds of metres at speeds that can injure and kill
Gravel mining pollutes the air with particulate matter and dust
Gravel mining increases traffic hazards for children, pedestrians, cyclists and commuters
Prime agricultural lands removed by gravel mining are  rarely restored to become productive agricultural land
Gravel mining destroys the value of people's homes
Community groups opposing applications for gravel mining are forced to represent themselves in front of a single, unaccountable official in a quasi-legal hearing
Community groups opposing applications for gravel mining are forced to educate themselves in complex areas of planning, hydrogeology, blasting, and other technical specialties, requiring thousands of hours of volunteer time
Community groups are forced to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars to retain lawyers, planners, and technical experts to support their opposition to gravel mining applications

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* 3. Have you ever been involved in opposing an application for aggregate extraction (i.e. gravel mining)?

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* 4. How aware were you of gravel mining issues before responding to this survey?

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* 5. Do you support Doug Ford's proposals for...

  Agree Somewhat agree Somewhat disagree Disagree Don't know
more highways
expanding the urban boundaries
designating farmland for development

Water Watchers believes that new highways and urban sprawl increases demand for more gravel mining, and together these fuel the climate crisis. The time for sweeping reforms of gravel mining is long overdue. There is enough aggregate available in the 6000+ pits and quarries Ontario has licensed, that Ontario could impose a moratorium on all new applicants for gravel mining and take the time necessary to reform gravel mining in Ontario.

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* 6. Would you support a moratorium on all new applications for gravel mining in Ontario?

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* 7. Do you have any other comments you would like to share?

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* 8. Would you like to receive more information on Water Watcher's campaign to win a moratorium on all new applications for gravel mining in Ontario? If yes, please provide your contact information below.



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