The Accountability Research Center (ARC) has recently been engaged in conversations about the role of language access and the importance of interpreters in social accountability work. We are interested in learning about organizations or initiatives from around the world that explicitly link language access and language rights to social accountability. Please take 5 minutes to complete this survey to share what you know with us. Thank you!

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* 1. Are you aware of any social accountability initiatives that highlight the contribution of interpreters to making the state less exclusionary or to making citizen voice more likely to be heard by authorities  (e.g., with some kind of compensation, either monetary or honorific)? If so, please share what it is.

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* 2. Are you aware of any social accountability initiatives that use open government tools (e.g., budget transparency, access to information laws) to determine whether governments allocate resources to facilitate language access (e.g., to hire interpreters, to pay for translations)? If so, please share what it is.

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* 3. Community health workers and community paralegals are increasingly recognized as professionals within the transparency, participation and accountability (TPA) field--how might community interpreters gain similar recognition?

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* 4. What is the most appropriate term to capture differences in languages of government/CSO staff and marginalized or minority communities? For example, non-hegemonic languages, minority languages, non-dominant languages, other?

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* 5. If you would like to identify yourself so that we can discuss this topic further with you, please enter your name, organization, and contact info here.

Thank you for helping with this effort to gather information on social accountability initiatives which address language access issues!

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