Introduction

Thank you for taking the time to complete this survey.

We are interested in learning how English teachers develop knowledge about literature, and what they think is important literary knowledge for their students.  Consequently, this survey asks you questions about aspects of your own literary and teacher education and about your current professional practice as an English teacher and teacher of literature.

The survey is one facet of the Investigating Literary Knowledge in the Making of English Teachers project funded by the Australian Research Council for 4 years, 2016-2019. Chief Investigators for the project are: Associate Professor Larissa McLean Davies and Professor Lyn Yates from the Melbourne Graduate School of Education at the University of Melbourne; Professor Philip Mead from the University of Western Australia; Professor Wayne Sawyer from Western Sydney University and Professor Brenton Doecke from Deakin University. The Project Manager is Dr Lucy Buzacott (University of Melbourne).

In many curriculum documents there are definitions and explanations of 'literature' and literary education. The current Australian Curriculum: English document, for example, includes the following definition:

The term ‘literature’ includes literary texts from across a range of historical and cultural contexts that are valued for their form and style and are recognized as having enduring or artistic value. While the nature of what constitutes literary texts is dynamic and evolving, they are seen as having personal, social, cultural and aesthetic value and potential for enriching students' scope of experience. Literature includes a broad range of forms such as novels, poetry, short stories and plays; fiction for young adults and children, multimodal texts such as film, and a variety of non-fiction. [...]

The range of literary texts for study from Foundation to Year 10 comprises classic and contemporary world literature. It emphasizes Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, as well as the contemporary literature of these two cultural groups. It also includes texts from and about Asia.

(http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/english/key-ideas)

You may be working with this understanding in your school context, or thinking of literature differently. In the survey that follows we have deliberately not specified how ‘literature’ is to be defined – the survey aims to find out your views. The survey gives you the opportunity to provide valuable information about your understanding of literature and your practices as a teacher of English.

Thank you for taking this survey and contributing to this important research on education in Australia.

Please be advised that by clicking NEXT and completing this survey, you are voluntarily consenting to participate in this research. Should you wish to withdraw at any stage, or to withdraw any unprocessed data you have supplied, you are free to do so without prejudice. To withdraw your data from this research, please contact Lucy Buzacott through the details below.

If you have any questions about the survey or the project please contact:

Dr Lucy Buzacott
Email: lucy.buzacott@unimelb.edu.au
Phone: (03) 8344 7605

* 1. I consent to participating in this research project by completing the survey

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