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* 1. The foreface comprised of the upper and lower jaws. In the Newfoundland the depth and length are approximately equal.

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* 2. An indentation between the muzzle and the forehead. In the Newfoundland the slope is moderate, but because of the well developed brow, it may appear abrupt in profile.

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* 3. The highest point of the skull at the back of the head and a prominent feature on some dogs. In the Newfoundland, all the parts of the head should blend together smoothly.

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* 4. The top point of the shoulders, marking the highest point along the dog’s back, and the place where height is measured. In Newfoundlands average height for adult dogs is 28 inches, for adult bitches, 26 inches

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* 5. The top of the sternum, a bone that ties the rib cage together. In the Newfoundland, this projects beyond the point of shoulder.

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* 6. The lower curve outline of the chest or ribcage, in some breeds called the keel. In the Newfoundland, this should reach at least down to the elbows.

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* 7. The muscular area on the rump or buttocks of the dog, forward of the set-on of tail. In the Newfoundland it should be broad and slightly sloping. 

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* 8. The section of the back between the end of the rib cage and the beginning of the pelvic bone. This must be just long enough to permit suppleness. 

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* 9. The joint that sits on the front of the hind leg in line with the abdomen. In the Newfoundland they should be well bent to provide flexibility. 

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* 10. The joint that connects the paw (talus and calcaneus bones) to the shin bones (tibia and fibula) in the rear leg. In the Newfoundland, they should be perpendicular to the ground when standing. 

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