This is a survey to gather font vendor/foundry feedback about two different approaches to having fonts on a Web server that can be used by Web pages. Please only take this survey if you are a font vendor; there is a separate survey for Web designers/developers:http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=wyFVRRqnxAmTypkzThJOkA_3d_3d.

Feel free to pass the link to this survey on to other font developers.

Note that contact info is required (name, foundry/vendor, country and email address). Only one entry per font vendor please!

BACKGROUND

There are two approaches currently being considered by the W3C for being able to have fonts on a Web server. Both approaches would work with OpenType and Windows TrueType fonts. Both require active support from Web browsers to work.

One is just placing the original fonts on the Web server. This would just require a reference in the CSS, and placing the font on the Web server. Most of the thought on this is that the user would simply be responsible for checking the font license terms. Currently I know of no retail fonts that could legally be used in this way, and the general thinking is that this usage would be legal only with free and open source fonts (that is, not any retail fonts or fonts bundled with Mac OS or Windows).

The other option is the .EOT font format. This was originally created by Microsoft, but they are offering to give the format to the W3C as an open format. This involves some encryption and doesn't put entire font files loose on a Web server. EOT fonts can also specify what URLs/domains the fonts can be used with. End users would still need to check their licensing terms, but the process of creating EOT files also checks font embedding bits, meaning that fonts that don't allow embedding at all simply won't work with it.

Note also that neither approach stops end users from simply copying the font/EOT from the server (it is possible to prevent this on the server set-up side of things - you could require this in your license terms, but it's a server configuration issue that can't be easily enforced elsewhere).

For both links to more info and my commentary, see also my blog post on the subject at: http://blogs.adobe.com/typblography/2007/11/web_fonts_1.html

1. Do your current license terms (EULA) permit the following forms of font "embedding" for the Web? (If you're about to revise your license terms in this area, answer for the new terms.)

  Yes Yes, with limitations Yes, with extended license Yes, w/limitations & ext. license No Unsure
Original fonts on Web server (as promoted by Haakon Lie)
.EOT fonts on Web server (as promoted by Microsoft)

2. How comfortable are you with each of these proposals becoming commonplace in use?

  Extremely Very Moderately Not very Not at all N/A
Original fonts on Web servers
.EOT fonts on Web servers

3. How much would you like to see each of the following possible modifications to the "original fonts on Web servers" approach?

  Vital Desirable No preference Undesirable Strongly opposed
A) Fonts have to be in the same domain to be used (can't point to a font on somebody else's server)
B) Fonts only work if they are set to "installable" embedding (would restrict it to truly "free" fonts and a few others)
C) Fonts only work if set with a new bit that specifically allows such usage (no existing fonts would work)

4. Would your license (now or in the near future) allow for original fonts being placed on web pages, if the scheme were modified to make it more protective of the font usage?

  Yes Yes, with limitations Yes, with extended license Yes, w/limitations & ext. license No Unsure
A) Fonts have to be in the same domain to be used (can't point to a font on somebody else's server)
B) Fonts only work if they are set to "installable" embedding (would restrict it to truly "free" fonts and a few others)
C) Fonts only work if set with a new bit that specifically allows such usage (no existing fonts would work)
D) A & B
E) A & C

5. Please tell us who you are so we can better track font vendor/foundry opinion. One response per company, please!

6. What's your email address?

7. What's the URL for your foundry/vendor web site? (optional)

8. How would you describe the primary licensing model of your fonts?

9. Roughly how many unique fonts do you offer? Count different styles (example: bold and italic), but not different formats (example: Type 1 vs OpenType).

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