You be the Judge!

In honor of Free Speech Week, the First Amendment Museum is letting you be the Judge! Every day this week we will provide you with a summary of a famous Supreme Court case involving free speech. Read the case and vote as though you were a Supreme Court Justice. All cases will be presented as a yes or no question. Leave your explanation in the comments! 

Question Title

Case: Walker v. Texas Division, Sons of Confederate Veterans, Inc.

<em>Case: Walker v. Texas Division, Sons of Confederate Veterans, Inc.</em>

Question Title

* 1. In August 2009, the Texas division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans (Texas SCV) applied to have a new specialty license plate issued by the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles (TDMV). The proposed license plate had two confederate flags on it. TDMV had a policy stating that it "may refuse to create a new specialty license plate if the design might be offensive to any member of the public." The board in charge of approving new specialty plates voted to deny Texas SCV's application, and Texas SCV sued in federal district court claiming their free speech rights had been violated. The TDMV argued that the Free Speech Clause did not apply in this case because license plates are a form of government speech; therefore, TDMV were within their rights to choose which messages and views they wanted to express on the plates. 

Question: Did the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles violate the free speech rights of the Sons of Confederate Veterans by denying their license plate design?

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