Introduction

Privacy Notice:
Information provided in this survey is considered a public record and may be subject to public disclosure. For more information, see the Public Records Act, RCW Chapter 42.56. To learn more about how we manage your information, see our Privacy Statement.

Note: this survey will close on Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Throughout April and May, 23 miles of  Neighborhood Greenways  were  upgraded to Stay Healthy Streets and opened to people walking, rolling, and biking. On May 7, Mayor Jenny Durkan announced 20 miles of Stay Healthy Streets would become permanent. Stay Healthy Streets can only be an asset with input and support from the people who live along and use them. This online survey is one way we are collecting information on the best approach for doing so, street selection, and making them a neighborhood treasure.  
 
The survey will inform the public engagement process and our goal of centering equity. If we truly want Stay Healthy Streets to be welcoming for all communities, then "we" must include everybody. It means understanding cultures that have existed in the neighborhood. It means valuing everyone's voices and finding ways to include them. It means everyone feels safe traveling on our sidewalks and streets. It means recognizing racism and becoming an ally.  Thank you for taking our survey and visit this link for resources on how to deepen anti-racism efforts.
Definitions:
Neighborhood greenways are safer, calmer residential streets for you, your family, and neighbors. They include things like safer crossings of busy streets, signs and pavement markings to help people find their way, and traffic calming.

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1. Stay Healthy Streets are upgraded neighborhood greenways where the streets have been closed to make it okay for people to walk in the street. Like any neighborhood street, cut-thru traffic is discouraged, but local access, deliveries, waste pickup and emergency vehicles are allowed. During COVID19 the goal of Stay Healthy Streets is to make it easier to keep 6 feet apart.  Is this how you understand the program?

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2. Keep Moving Streets are streets that have been closed in a partnership between SDOT and Seattle Parks and Recreation to allow more space for social distancing at some of Seattle’s most popular destinations. On Keep Moving Streets local access, deliveries, waste pick up and emergency vehicles are allowed. The goal of Keep Moving Streets is to make it okay to walk in the street and easier to keep 6 feet apart. Keep Moving Streets are currently being implemented as a temporary COVID-19 emergency response only. Is this how you understand the program?

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3. Do you live on or near a Stay Healthy or Keep Moving Street?

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4. Do you use a Stay Healthy or Keep Moving Street?

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Map of Stay Healthy and Keep Moving Streets in Seattle (with labels)

Map of Stay Healthy and Keep Moving Streets in Seattle (with labels)
 
17% of survey complete.

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