Proposed Policy Changes

City Council will be voting on updates to Denver's group living code in early February. I’m eager for your feedback before then, particularly since these proposed updates could have a significant impact on housing affordability in Denver.

We do ask for demographic information in the survey. This data will only be viewed in aggregate so that my office can better understand how this issue impacts our district. We require an email address to take the survey to ensure everyone only takes the survey once.

The two areas under consideration will define and regulate the nature of Households as well as update regulations around Residential Care uses. 

HOUSEHOLD LIVING: Denver's department of Community Planning and Development (CPD) studied national practices to address issues of housing affordability in Denver. They found that updates to our common living arrangement rules and regulations could be one tool they believe will aide in making Denver a more affordable place to live. Denver's outdated definition of “household” limits common living arrangements and reduces affordability, especially for people who could live with roommates. By allowing more than two unrelated people to live together (Denver's current regulation), as is already possible in most other cities, CPD and the Group Living Advisory Committee believe this can improve flexibility and affordability.

RESIDENTIAL CARE: Some people with special needs live in Residential Care Facilities. Residential care includes elder care facilities, hospices, homeless shelters, sober living homes, half-way houses or community corrections facilities. According to national practices, CPD analysis shows that Denver's current rules and regulations perpetuate inequity, effectively keeping some populations from living in residential neighborhoods and near jobs, transit, family and other services they need. By allowing residential care in more places, CPD believes this will eliminate many barriers allowing people who need support to access services and care with dignity. An approach that could to help ease the increase in homelessness we are experiencing in Denver now.

A halfway house is a place to live for those who have been sentenced to live there by District Court as an alternative to prison or who are state prison inmates eligible for parole who have met the requirements to transition to a halfway house. In Denver, halfway houses are referred to as “Community Corrections” following the state’s terminology.

Your replies to this section will be kept private.

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* 1. Email address

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* 2. The proposal would cap the number of adults permitted to live together in households where not all residents are related at 5. Currently only 2 are allowed in a house and 4 in a duplex or apartment.

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* 3. The proposal would continue to allow any number of related adults to live together where none of the residents are unrelated.

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* 4. The proposal would cap the number of smaller residential care facilities (serving up to 10 people) in a single area to avoid overburdening neighborhoods.

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* 5. The proposal would categorize residential care facilities by size instead of their services. Residential care facilities of 11-20 residents would be permitted in single-unit, two-unit and row house zones and permitted only on parcels previously used for civic, public and institutional structures (like an old church). Community corrections uses would be prohibited in single and two unit zone districts.

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* 6. The proposal would expand the land area available for community corrections from ~3,210 acres primarily in industrial areas and downtown today to ~19,777 acres throughout the city, primarily along commercial corridors, where there is better access to transit and jobs. Community corrections uses would be prohibited in single and two unit zone districts.

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* 7. Below is a list of benefits we've heard about regarding the need to reform Denver's current group living rules and regulations. Please select which ones you like.

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* 8. Below is a list of concerns we've heard about regarding the need to reform Denver's current group living rules and regulations. Please select which ones you are concerned about.

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