Instructions and Definitions

Thank you for taking the time to complete this important survey! This survey focuses on your program’s work with survivors of domestic violence and their children who are experiencing mental health challenges or who use substances. The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health (NCDVTMH) is collecting this information from programs across the United States so that the domestic violence field at large can better understand these issues. The information collected from this survey will also help NCDVTMH and others to develop strategies and provide supports to the domestic violence field in addressing mental health challenges and substance use.

This survey should be completed by someone in your program who has been in their position for at least a year and is knowledgeable about the ways that domestic violence services are delivered. Ideally, it would be completed by a domestic violence services director or a staff member in a related position. Only one staff member from your program should complete this survey. While your feedback is appreciated and greatly valued, your participation in this survey is voluntary. This survey is anonymous: we are not asking for your name or your program’s name, and results will be reported in aggregate (across all programs and responses) only. We will also be sharing aggregate survey results with your state, territory, or Tribal coalition so that they can provide more responsive training and technical assistance.


Definitions:

In this survey, mental health challenges encompasses a broad and complex range of experiences: any kind of challenge related to a person’s emotions, perceptions, or attention that creates problems for them. Some people prefer to talk about their mental health challenges in terms of symptoms and diagnoses, whereas others feel strongly about not using medical terminology to describe their experiences. Domestic violence and other trauma can impact survivors’ mental health by creating new challenges or making existing ones worse. Additionally, coping strategies that survivors use to stay alive, to manage feelings, or to take care of themselves may be seen as problematic by others, but not necessarily by survivors themselves. To add to the complexity, sometimes survivors who are experiencing more severe or disabling mental health challenges, such as those associated with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, may not be able to immediately recognize that what they are feeling, perceiving, or doing are causing problems for them.

This survey also includes items on substance use. “Substances” refers to anything that produces an intoxicating effect, encompassing alcohol and other drugs. Some medications that are prescribed by a physician can be considered “substances” if used other than directed, including use that leads to an intoxicating effect. Substance use occurs across a spectrum: from occasional use that causes no problems to use that leads to major health problems, overdoses, addiction, or death. When people have problems related to their use of substances, there are a variety of different terms that may be used to describe their experiences. Depending on the situation, the person, the degree of problems encountered, and the field or school of thought, the following terms might be used to describe substance use that leads to problems: substance abuse, substance misuse, substance use disorder, or addiction.

In this survey, clinical staff describes staff members with specialized education and/or licensure for providing mental health or substance use disorder treatment services. This may include a wide range of professionals including psychologists, Certified Alcohol and Other Drug Counselor (CADC) professionals, clinical social workers, psychiatrists, or masters’ level therapists/counselors including LCPCs or trauma therapists. For the purposes of this survey, we are only interested in clinical staff who provide these services to domestic violence survivors and/or their kids. This may include clinical staff who are embedded in domestic violence services or programming.

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* 1. What is your role within your program?  Please select all that apply.

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* 2. How long have you worked for your program?

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* 3. Which state/territory/Tribal nation is your program in?

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* 4. Is your program...

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* 5. Overall, in the past 2 years, have you seen any changes in the kinds of substances that survivors served by your domestic violence program are using? 

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* 6. Overall, in the past 2 years, have you seen any changes in the kinds of mental health challenges among survivors served by your domestic violence program? 

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* 7. Overall, how prepared is your domestic violence program to work with …

  Not prepared at all A little prepared Somewhat prepared Very prepared
Adult survivors with disabling mental health challenges
Adult survivors with mental health challenges that cause few problems
Children and adolescents experiencing behavioral and mental health challenges
Survivors who have problems related to their substance use
Survivors who are parenting and also are struggling with their substance use
Survivors who are parenting and also have disabling mental health challenges

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* 8. Overall, in the past 2 years, has your domestic violence program seen an increased demand for the following kinds of services?

  Yes No I don't know
Trauma-focused mental health services, like counseling or therapy
Mental health and psychiatric services for survivors experiencing more disabling mental health challenges, such as those associated with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder
Parent-child services to support children who have behavioral and mental health problems
Mental health services, like counseling or therapy, for children of survivors
Substance use disorder treatment services, like counseling or groups
Other kinds of mental health or substance abuse treatment services

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* 9. What has been going especially well in addressing any of these challenges? What are you most proud about in the way that your domestic violence program responds to these issues?

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