In recent weeks, progress has been made on two possible vaccines for COVID-19. One is being developed by the pharmaceutical company Pfizer, while the other is being produced by the biotechnology firm Moderna. Both have moved at record speed and have shown promising results, with an efficacy rate of 95% and 94.5% respectively. Both drugmakers will seek federal regulatory approvals in the coming weeks to begin distributing the vaccines.

There will be approximately 20 million doses available initially to distribute as soon as late-December in accordance with a framework devised by the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Those who are at high-risk due to their age, underlying condition, or job (such as frontline workers) are likely to receive the vaccine first. Those who are healthier, don’t have medical conditions, or don’t have high-risk jobs are likely to get the vaccine as soon as April 2021.

Both vaccines require two doses. Phfizer’s  booster shot will be given three week after the first one, while Moderna’s will take place four weeks apart. The full safety data for each vaccine hasn’t been made available yet, but no serious safety concerns have been reported during their human trials. Pfizer’s vaccine has reported slight pain at the injection site, as well as fatigue, chills and fever. Moderna’s has also included pain at the injection site, as well as muscle aches and headaches.

We are still learning more about each vaccine, but in advance of their regulatory approvals, we appreciate if you can answer the following questions:

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* 1. Please select your age group:

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* 2. Please select your sex?

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* 3. Are you an Akwesasne resident?

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* 4. If the vaccine became available would you be willing to be vaccinated?

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* 5. If you indicated NO to being vaccinated, what is/are the reasons for your decision?

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