Two-Year Feedback Survey

The Supreme Court of Canada has published Cases in Brief – short summaries of decisions drafted in reader-friendly language – since March 2018. With this short survey, we are looking to understand who uses these documents, why you use them, and how we can make them better.

Your answers are anonymous. You can choose not to answer any question if you don’t want to. But the more information we have, the more it will help us improve Cases in Brief. The survey is 20 questions long and should take 5-10 minutes to finish.

If you have any questions about this survey, please email media@scc-csc.ca.

***Disponible en français***

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* 1. Which of the following best describes who you are (in terms of why you read Cases in Brief)?

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* 2. How did you find out about Cases in Brief?

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* 3. Approximately how many Cases in Brief would you guess you’ve read since the beginning? (As of March 23, 2020, there have been over 80 published.)

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* 4. Where do you access Cases in Brief?

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* 5. Do you download PDFs of Cases in Brief for future reference?

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* 6. Before the Court published Cases in Brief, would you read decisions or headnotes?

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* 7. Do you read Cases in Brief in English or French?

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* 8. If you would sometimes read headnotes and decisions before we started publishing Cases in Brief, have Cases in Brief changed anything?

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* 9. What is your main source of news about the Supreme Court?

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* 10. Do you have any experience in the courts or legal system?

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* 11. In general, do you find reading legal texts difficult? (We mean texts like court decisions, legislation, contracts, etc. - not including Cases in Brief.)

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* 12. Please rate your agreement with the following questions about the Supreme Court’s Cases in Brief.

  Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Not sure
Cases in Brief use vocabulary and sentence structure that is easy to understand.
Cases in Brief explain legal concepts well.
Cases in Brief are accurate.
Cases in Brief focus on the right issues, and give me relevant and useful information.
Cases in Brief help me understand Supreme Court decisions better.
Cases in Brief are a trustworthy and reliable source of information about Supreme Court decisions.
Cases in Brief are useful for the general public.
Cases in Brief are useful for people working in the legal profession.

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* 13. Please provide any other comments that you think might help us improve Cases in Brief. For example, let us know:

- How specifically are Cases in Brief useful to you?
- What can we do to make them better (more useful, more accessible, etc.)?
- Are definitions of legal concepts helpful?
- Are Cases in Brief too long, too short, or just right?
- Should we include more (or different) links and information?
- Have you noticed any one-off or recurring issues or problems?
- For bilingual readers, do you notice any differences between the two language versions (style, level of vocabulary, etc.)?
- What can we do better?

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* 14. The last seven questions are demographic questions to help us understand who reads Cases in Brief. You don't need to answer if you don't want to.

What do you consider your first language?

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* 15. What is your highest level of education?

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* 16. How old are you?

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* 17. If you have a disability that affects your ability to access or understand Cases in Brief, please share any information that may help us understand the challenge you face and anything we might be able to do to improve the content or accessibility of these documents.

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* 18. Where in (or outside) Canada do you live?

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* 19. What size of community do you live in?

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