Eight Actions in an Innovative Classroom: How often do students have the opportunity to engage in these actions?

 
Imagine, Be curious
…visualize beyond practical limits
…explore materials, ideas and environment

*
1. Overall, how often is this Action—imagination and curiosity—part of your classroom?

Examples

(not intended to be definitive or all-inclusive; rather, they are meant to be springboards to your own thinking)
Kindergarten-age:   Draw a picture of what might happen if pigs could fly.

Civics classroom:  Ask what will be the consequences if one element of an historical event is changed. 

History and Literacy:  Explore the historical events surrounding a period of writing and imagine what it might have felt like to live at that time.
Help Oklahoma develop a resource bank of best ideas, practices, and questions.
Input Your Information Here for Action 1:

* Your Example(s)

* Your Discipline / Grade Level

* Load a lesson plan, student artifact, video etc.

 
Generate
…express original ideas
…new connections
…find alternatives

*
2. Overall, how often is this Action—generating ideas—part of your classroom?

Examples

(not intended to be definitive or all-inclusive; rather, they are meant to be springboards to your own thinking)
Middle School Social Science class (and other levels):   Socratic Circles - where the leader asks open-ended questions around authentic texts and expects students to listen to others, think critically, and formulate intelligent responses.

Literature, Music, Visual Art:  Students explore and express “tone” in poetry, using musical instruments or visual art in response to a reading.

All disciplines/grade levels:  Students respond to a concept with original student work.
Help Oklahoma develop a resource bank of best ideas, practices, and questions.
Input Your Information Here for Action 5:

* Your Example(s)

* Your Discipline / Grade Level

* Load a lesson plan, student artifact, video etc.

 
Question
…ponder outcomes

…wonder about options

…reframe questions or problems

*
3. Overall, how often is this Action—questioning—part of your classroom?

Examples

(not intended to be definitive or all-inclusive; rather, they are meant to be springboards to your own thinking)
Math:  On the basketball court, determine where a player should stand and how high to throw to get the ball through the hoop consistently.

Social Studies:  Students ponder the societal outcomes if Rosa Parks had given up her seat on the bus.

Geography:  Students brainstorm questions to explore around global poverty as a starter for further research and discovery.

Elementary Language Arts:  Students take a classic fairy tale and rewrite it from a different perspective.
Help Oklahoma develop a resource bank of best ideas, practices, and questions.
Input Your Information Here for Action 9:

* Your Example(s)

* Your Discipline / Grade Level

* Load a lesson plan, student artifact, video etc.

 
Combine
…across disciplines
…arts integration
…STEM/STEAM

*
4. Overall, how often is this Action—combining—part of your classroom?

Examples

(not intended to be definitive or all-inclusive; rather, they are meant to be springboards to your own thinking)
Elementary Math and Grammar:  Students explore what punctuation marks share with mathematical symbols.

Language Arts, History, and Social Studies:  What do Greek myths have in common with contemporary TV programming? Link to video.

Biology and Technology:  Students use computer simulations in studying the impact of viruses on their environment and generate solutions to the predicted negative outcomes.
Help Oklahoma develop a resource bank of best ideas, practices, and questions.
Input Your Information Here for Action 13:

* Your Example(s)

* Your Discipline / Grade Level

* Load a lesson plan, student artifact, video etc.

Risk (Take chances)
…question alternatives
…experiment with new ideas

*
5. Overall, how often is this Action—risking—part of your classroom?

Examples

(not intended to be definitive or all-inclusive; rather, they are meant to be springboards to your own thinking)
All disciplines/grade levels:  Student leadership opportunities for students to try roles or processes that are not typical of them.

Economics:  Students develop and market their ideas for new businesses in Oklahoma, developing a business plan.

Science and Art:  Students identify an initiative that would improve the world and strategize in order to effect change, showcasing their collective solution.
Help Oklahoma develop a resource bank of best ideas, practices, and questions.
Input Your Information Here for Action 17:

* Your Example(s)

* Your Discipline / Grade Level

* Load a lesson plan, student artifact, video etc.

 
Expand
…enlarge, enrich, embellish ideas
…adapt to change

*
6. Overall, how often is this Action—expanding—part of your classroom?

Examples

(not intended to be definitive or all-inclusive; rather, they are meant to be springboards to your own thinking)
Writing (persuasive, creative, etc.):  Students convey to a larger audience what they discover while writing an essay.

Technology:  Students use a digital survey to better understand a problem.

Music Composition:  Create a piece of music to illustrate a point of view from a literary text.
Help Oklahoma develop a resource bank of best ideas, practices, and questions.
Input Your Information Here for Action 21:

* Your Example(s)

* Your Discipline / Grade Level

* Load a lesson plan, student artifact, video etc.

 
Predict
…from experimentation
…trends or change      
…defend

*
7. Overall, how often is this Action—predicting—part of your classroom?

Examples

(not intended to be definitive or all-inclusive; rather, they are meant to be springboards to your own thinking)
Pre-K/Kindergarten:  Given a set of colored blocks or pictures, predict the pattern sequence or story ending.

Political Science:  Students review election outcome trends by state and make predictions.

11th-12th grade Science:  Predict the outcome of a study based on your research/reading of scientific texts.
Help Oklahoma develop a resource bank of best ideas, practices, and questions.
Input Your Information Here for Action 25:

* Your Example(s)

* Your Discipline / Grade Level

* Load a lesson plan, student artifact, video etc.

Classify
… establish order in complex environments
…in new and novel ways

*
8. Overall, how often is this Action--classifying—part of your classroom?

Examples

(not intended to be definitive or all-inclusive; rather, they are meant to be springboards to your own thinking)
Elementary Social Studies:  Group into “countries,” and establish the governance, monetary system, and infrastructure of the country.  Students design a virtual museum of Oklahoma history.

Elementary Science:  Students determine various groupings of organisms based on detailed photographs as an introduction to scientific classification.

Art History:  Students explore curating by sorting works of art into multiple categories.
Help Oklahoma develop a resource bank of best ideas, practices, and questions.
Input Your Information Here for Action 29:

* Your Example(s)

* Your Discipline / Grade Level

* Load a lesson plan, student artifact, video etc.

Report a problem

T