1. Beliefs About Teaching Geometry

We are preparing to submit a grant proposal to the National Science Foundation next fall and need your help in shaping the proposal.   Thank you for completing this survey that will provide us with the data we need.   Your responses are confidential.   You will not be identified by name

Directions:   Please indicate your belief about each of the questions below by circling any one of the nine responses in the columns on the right side, ranging from (1) “Not at all” to (9) “A Great Deal” as each represents a degree on the continuum.

* 1. Please respond to each of the questions by considering the combination of your current ability, resources, and opportunity to do each of the following in your present position.

  1 - Not at All 2 3 - Very Little 4 5 - Some Degree 6 7 - Quite a Bit 8 9 - A Great Deal
To what extent are students appropriately placed into Geometry?
To what extent are students adequately prepared for Geometry?
How much can you do to help your students value learning Geometry?
To what extent can you craft good questions for your Geometry students?
How much can you do to teach students to create good geometric proofs?
How much can you do to help students believe they can do well in Geometry?
To what extent do you use a variety of assessment strategies in Geometry?
To what extent can you provide an alternative explanation or example when your students are confused?
To what extent can you assist families in helping their children do well in Geometry?
How well can you implement alternative teaching strategies in Geometry?
To what extent can you facilitate student questions and discussion during Geometry instruction?
How much can you do to influence the achievement of students with low motivation in Geometry?
How much can you do to influence the achievement of students who can recognize geometric shapes, but don’t know any of their properties?
To what extent do you have the necessary content knowledge to teach Geometry well?
To what extent do you have the necessary pedagogical (methods of teaching) knowledge to teach Geometry well?
To what extent do you have the necessary knowledge and skills to produce meaningful progress in Geometry for every student?
To what extent do you base your Geometry instruction on a theoretical model such as the van Hiele model of geometric understanding?
How much can you do to motivate students who show low interest in Geometry?
How well can you explain to students how geometric proofs work?

* 2. Please rate your level of knowledge in the following areas by circling the appropriate letter to the right of each statement.

  Excellent Above Average Average Below Average No Knowledge
How would you rate your level of knowledge of the use of manipulatives such as geoboards or geo-strips (Ang-legs) in the Geometry classroom?
How would you rate your level of knowledge of the use of the graphing calculator in the Geometry classroom?
How would you rate your capacity to explain Geometry vocabulary?
How would you rate your ability to make use of a variety of grouping practices in the Geometry classroom?
How would you rate your use of strategies to differentiate for varying levels of student knowledge and/or need?

* 3. Please indicate the degree to which you agree or disagree with each statement below by circling the appropriate letter(s) to the right of each statement.

  Strongly Disagree Disagree Uncertain Agree Strongly Agree
Students’ achievement in Geometry is directly related to their teacher’s effectiveness in Geometry teaching.
The teacher is generally responsible for the achievement of students in Geometry.
Increased effort in Geometry teaching produces little change in some students’ Geometry achievement.
The low Geometry achievement of some students cannot generally be blamed on their teachers.
The inadequacy of a student’s Geometry background can be overcome by good teaching.
The use of manipulatives such as geoboards, Geo-strips or Ang-legs, solids, and nets contribute to effective Geometry teaching.
Specific instruction in Geometry vocabulary is an important part of effective Geometry teaching.
Student questions and discussion are an important part of effective Geometry instruction.
The use of graphing calculators contributes to effective Geometry teaching.
If students are underachieving in Geometry, it is most likely due to ineffective geometry teaching.
When the Geometry grades of students improve, it is often due to their teacher having found a more effective teaching approach.
I am continually finding better ways to teach Geometry.

* 4. Have the types of students you teach in Geometry changed in the last five years?   If so, how?

* 5. Please list professional development activities you have participated that helped you improve your Geometry teaching.

* 6. What specific topics or techniques would you suggest be included in professional development for improving your Geometry teaching?

* 7. Please rank order the activities you listed above by putting “1” next to the activity you feel would be most beneficial, 2 by the next most beneficial, etc.

* 8. What is your gender?

* 9. What is your racial identity?

* 10. What level do you teach?

* 11. How many years have you taught?

* 12. What school division do you teach in?

* 13. What school do you teach in?

* 14. What is your certification or endorsement? (Please check all that apply.)

* 15. Have you participated in any grant-sponsored professional development?

* 16. Please list all the courses you currently teach and the format in which they are taught; for example, Algebra I for 90 minutes each day for one semester or Geometry for 115 minutes every other day for the whole year.

* 17. What other courses have you taught in the past?

* 18. Your Name:

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