Online Surveys = Ongoing Insights

How Feedback Can Get You the Right Audience — Fast

 → 
 → 
How Feedback Can Get You the Right Audience — Fast

Get the right audienceAcademics. Business. Entrepreneurship. Say you have your head in each of these spaces. Each one arguably requires a different type of focus and set of skills, however a common thread runs through the fabric of each—customer satisfaction.

To be a success, you have to ensure your customers—whether those customers are students, clients, vendors or stakeholders—are, yes, happy with you and the services you’re providing them.

Sure, it’s a no-brainer that you want people to be satisfied with you—so, how do you do it? And how do you do it efficiently? Here to talk about how the data she collects helps her accomplish all of that and a little more is Dr. Erin Albert of Butler University. 

Thanks for joining us again, Dr. Albert!

As both an educator and entrepreneur, I am a huge fan of Jim Collins and his book, Good to Great. One of the best analogies in this business book classic is the concept of getting the “right” people on the bus (or team). Then, he writes it is important to get people in the “right seats” (or right jobs) over time for optimizing individuals’ strengths and talents on a team in order to maximize team efficiency and work overall.

But, what if you have a bigger bus (team) than you expected, and don’t have a lot of time to get people into the right seats?

Market Research Made Easy

Want to run your own market research project at an affordable price? We’ve got millions of people ready to take your survey. Choose from 30+ demographic attributes.

Get Started

Thankfully, SurveyMonkey helped us try to move 30 students at Butler University into the right seats quickly this academic year, as we founded a brand-new concept in a school of pharmacy—development of an open-access, student-driven multimedia healthcare review journal called BU Well. We originally targeted far fewer than 30 students, but due to high interest, had an exciting challenge of more students than we anticipated on this project.

Thirty students at Butler signed up to be part of creation of all the policies, procedures and bylaws of this healthcare review journal as an independent study course. But, because we only had a few short weeks to divvy up the work and more students eager to jump in than we had anticipated, we utilized SurveyMonkey to quickly ascertain how each student wanted to participate in the project.

First, we divided the work into 6 sub-teams (as shown in the illustration) and created brief descriptions for each sub-team’s charges. Then, we built a survey to ask students if they preferred to write, edit and/or lead a team using SurveyMonkey. Next, we asked students to rank order their preferred teams. From the data collected, we also attempted to stratify students across teams by different years in our program (the first, second or third professional year of the program).

Sub-teams

While trying to respect all the parameters of stratification by year in the program, preferences both for leadership as well as type of subteam preferred, we created several subteams with the majority of students getting their first or second team preferences.

The sub-teams just had their midpoint evaluations on their work. Each team did a fantastic job in describing and sharing their respective draft process, procedures, promotion and forms for this healthcare review. We are thankfully still on track to have an open call for articles for the first volume of BU Well to be published next summer.

Dr. Erin Albert is an entrepreneur, author, pharmacist, lawyer, STEM advocate, and associate professor of pharmacy practice at Butler University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.

Questions, comments for her? You know where to go.

Get the Feedback eGuide

Tags: , , , , , ,

Inspired? Create your own survey.

Inspired? Create your own survey.

PRO Sign Up Sign Up FREE or Sign in
Write Surveys Like a Pro

Ever wonder what SurveyMonkey’s really made of?

Ever wonder what SurveyMonkey's really made of?

Read our engineering blog »