Densho Poll - May 2009

Densho Survey -- Future Nikkei Community

 
Thank you for participating in Densho's monthly poll. We will share the results in the next eNews.
The number of Americans who identify themselves as Japanese declined to 796,700 in the 2000 census, from 847,562 in 1990, partly because of low immigration and birth rates. Also in the 2000 census, 350,000 cited Japanese and other backgrounds, the highest rate of multi-ethnic identification of any Asian group. What does this mean for the future of Japanese American culture? Is it being diluted? Will it disappear through assimilation? Tell us your opinion.
1. What components of Japanese American culture are important to preserve?
Not important
1

2

3

4
Very important
5
Appreciation of traditional Japanese arts like taiko, martial arts, ikebana, calligraphy
Knowledge of Japanese American history and the World War II incarceration
Preservation of historic buildings, Japantowns, former camps
Participation in community festivals like obon, mochitsuki, children’s day
Passing on values like gaman, haji, enryo, hard work, education
Cooking Japanese American food
Studying the Japanese language
Visiting Japanese ancestral home
2. What changes will define future Japanese American culture?
Not important
1

2

3

4
Very important
5
Intermarriage with other ethnic groups
Multiracial children
New immigration from Japan
Pop culture from Japan--karaoke, anime, Tokyo fashion
Passing of the Nisei generation
More Nikkei political, business, arts, and academic leaders
3. How Japanese does a Japanese American need to be? Do you consider hapa or quarter Japanese people to be full members of the Japanese American community?
4. If you are a racial “blend,” how do you self-identify?
5. What does the future Japanese American community look like?
YesNoUndecided
Less concerned with the World War II experience
Assimilated into broader society
Acculturated but not assimilated
Part of Pan-Asian America
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